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Science, Technology and Culture, 1700-1945


About the Series

Science, Technology and Culture, 1700-1945 focuses on the social, cultural, industrial and economic contexts of science and technology from the ‘scientific revolution’ up to the Second World War. Publishing lively, original, innovative research across a broad spectrum of subjects and genres by an international list of authors, the series has a global compass that concerns the development of modern science in all regions of the world. Subjects may range from close studies of particular sciences and problems to cultural and social histories of science, technology and biomedicine; accounts of scientific travel and exploration; transnational histories of scientific and technological change; monographs examining instruments, their makers and users; the material and visual cultures of science; contextual studies of institutions and of individual scientists, engineers and popularizers of science; and well-edited volumes of essays on themes in the field.

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British University Observatories 1772–1939

British University Observatories 1772–1939

1st Edition

By Roger Hutchins
November 15, 2016

British University Observatories fills a gap in the historiography of British astronomy by offering the histories of observatories identified as a group by their shared characteristics. The first full histories of the Oxford and Cambridge observatories are here central to an explanatory history of ...

Making Scientific Instruments in the Industrial Revolution

Making Scientific Instruments in the Industrial Revolution

1st Edition

By A.D. Morrison-Low
September 08, 2016

At the start of the Industrial Revolution, it appeared that most scientific instruments were made and sold in London, but by the time of the Great Exhibition in 1851, a number of provincial firms had the self-confidence to exhibit their products in London to an international audience. How had this ...

William Crookes (1832–1919) and the Commercialization of Science

William Crookes (1832–1919) and the Commercialization of Science

1st Edition

By William H. Brock
November 10, 2016

William Crookes' long life was one of unbroken scientific and business activity, culminating in his appointment as President of the Royal Society in 1913. Throughout his career he was an important science journalist, the discoverer of thallium, the inventor of the radiometer, investigator of ...

Jesse Ramsden (1735–1800) London's Leading Scientific Instrument Maker

Jesse Ramsden (1735–1800): London's Leading Scientific Instrument Maker

1st Edition

By Anita McConnell
November 28, 2016

Jesse Ramsden was one of the most prominent manufacturers of scientific instruments in the latter half of the eighteenth century. To own a Ramsden instrument, be it one of his great theodolites or one of the many sextants and barometers produced at his London workshop, was to own not only an ...

Science and Spectacle in the European Enlightenment

Science and Spectacle in the European Enlightenment

1st Edition

Edited By Christine Blondel, Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent
September 08, 2016

Air-pumps, electrical machines, colliding ivory balls, coloured sparks, mechanical planetariums, magic mirrors, hot-air balloons - these are just a sample of the devices displayed in public demonstrations of science in the eighteenth century. Public and private demonstrations of natural philosophy ...

The Language of Mineralogy John Walker, Chemistry and the Edinburgh Medical School, 1750-1800

The Language of Mineralogy: John Walker, Chemistry and the Edinburgh Medical School, 1750-1800

1st Edition

By Matthew D. Eddy
November 15, 2016

Classification is an important part of science, yet the specific methods used to construct Enlightenment systems of natural history have proven to be the bête noir of studies of eighteenth-century culture. One reason that systematic classification has received so little attention is that natural ...

Meeting Places: Scientific Congresses and Urban Identity in Victorian Britain

Meeting Places: Scientific Congresses and Urban Identity in Victorian Britain

1st Edition

By Louise Miskell
November 15, 2016

The promotion of knowledge was a major preoccupation of the Victorian era and, beginning in 1831 with the establishment of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, a number of national bodies were founded which used annual, week-long meetings held each year in a different town or ...

From Local Patriotism to a Planetary Perspective Impact Crater Research in Germany, 1930s-1970s

From Local Patriotism to a Planetary Perspective: Impact Crater Research in Germany, 1930s-1970s

1st Edition

By Martina Kolbl-Ebert
February 11, 2015

The Nördlinger Ries and Steinheim Basin, two conspicuous geological structures in southern Germany, were traditionally viewed as somewhat enigmatic but nevertheless definitely volcanic edifices until they were finally recognized as impact craters in the 1960s. The changing views about the origin of...

Science Policies and Twentieth-Century Dictatorships Spain, Italy and Argentina

Science Policies and Twentieth-Century Dictatorships: Spain, Italy and Argentina

1st Edition

Edited By Amparo Gómez, Antonio Fco. Canales, Brian Balmer
August 28, 2015

Making a fresh contribution to the political history of science, this book explores the connections between the science policies of three countries that each experienced considerable political upheaval in the twentieth century: Spain, Italy and Argentina. By focussing on these three countries, the ...

Sir James Dewar, 1842-1923 A Ruthless Chemist

Sir James Dewar, 1842-1923: A Ruthless Chemist

1st Edition

By J.S. Rowlinson
August 28, 2012

Sir James Dewar was a major figure in British chemistry for around 40 years. He held the posts of Jacksonian Professor of Natural Philosophy at Cambridge (1875-1923) and Fullerian Professor of Chemistry at the Royal Institution (1877-1923) and is remembered principally for his efforts to liquefy ...

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