1st Edition

Self in Relationships
Perspectives on Family Therapy from Developmental Psychology





ISBN 9781855759510
Published December 31, 2003 by Routledge
352 Pages

USD $49.95

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Book Description

Inspired by Daniel Stern's work on self-development, the authors suggest that by combining systemic therapy with a psychoanalytical aspect, family therapy can reach new depths. They argue that this will enrich our understanding of the relationships beween parents and children, and between siblings. There have been changes within psychoanalysis and family therapy which we believe can enrich both these theoretical fields. The idea is not to integrate but rather to bring about a mutual curiosity in these two areas, which may result in dialogues with each other and create reservoirs for ideas and practices which have been found to be useful.

Table of Contents

Series Editors’ Foreword -- Foreword -- Preface to the English Edition -- Preface -- Self in Relationships -- Introduction -- A Theoretical Survey -- Daniel Stern’s model of self-development -- Perspectives on the concept of self -- Intersubjectivity as a philosophical and psychological concept -- Relation-Oriented Therapy and Modern Developmental Psychology: Clinical Implications -- Understanding each other—what does that mean? On emotional exchange, self-experience, and interplay -- The traces of experiences and the significance of time in narrative therapy -- Self-experience, key metaphors, and family premises: the relation between common and individual stories -- Senses of self and interplay as a metaphor for therapy with adolescents -- Differences and similarities: the relationship between siblings -- Together or alone: a both/and approach in work with eating disorders -- What Now? Theoretical Perspectives and Reflections -- Involved thinking and concept formation as an aid in therapy -- Opposite and dilemma: reflection on therapy as a meeting place between psychoanalysis and family therapy -- To know or not to know—or how do we know that we know? -- On understanding relation and ethics: an ethical perspective on the narrative self

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