Sport and Apartheid South Africa : Histories of Politics, Power, and Protest book cover
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Sport and Apartheid South Africa
Histories of Politics, Power, and Protest



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ISBN 9781032070810
November 30, 2021 Forthcoming by Routledge
226 Pages

 
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Book Description

As athletes of today grapple with how to use their public platforms to fight for activist causes, Sport and Apartheid South Africa: Histories of Politics, Power, and Protest examines a set of longer histories of sport, ‘race’, and activism. The book seeks to uncover and understand new historical aspects of apartheid and sport, challenge myths, and rethink dominant narratives. It examines the subject of racially segregated sport in South Africa from national and transnational perspectives, asking questions about how athletes and administrators, transnational anti-apartheid groups and activists, and politicians around the world interpreted and internalized racial segregation in South Africa. By connecting the local to the global, this book illuminates the ways in which apartheid sport animated national and international debates, ranging from racism and human rights to Cold War politics and post-colonialism.

Sport and Apartheid South Africa is a significant new contribution to the study of race and politics in sport and will be a great resource for academics, researchers, and advanced students of History, Politics, International Relations, Sociology, and Political Geography.

The chapters in this book were originally published in The International Journal of the History of Sport.

Table of Contents

1. Sport in a Global Landscape of Anti-Apartheid Dissent: South African Histories from Within and Beyond

Michelle M. Sikes, Toby C. Rider and Matthew P. Llewellyn

2. Racing on the Rand: Black Competitive Cycling around Johannesburg, 1930–1960

Todd H. Leedy

3. Apartheid Mountaineering: Race, Politics, and the History of the University of Cape Town Mountain and Ski Club, 1933–1969

Farieda Khan

4. From Nairobi to Baden-Baden: African Politics, the International Olympic Committee, and Early Efforts to Censure Apartheid South Africa

Michelle M. Sikes

5. The Enemy of My Enemy is My Friend? A Clash of Anti-Apartheid Tactics and Targets in the Olympic Movement of the Early 1960s

Michelle M. Sikes

6. Experimental Tactics on an Uneven Playing Field: Multinational Football and the Apartheid Project during the 1970s

Gustav Venter

7. White’s Gambit in the Middle Game: Chess, Apartheid, and South Africa’s Sporting Isolation in the 1970s

Gustav Venter

8. Foster v. Fourie: Race, Politics, and Betrayal in Apartheid South Africa

Eric Allen Hall

9. Double Standards: South Africa, British Rugby, and the Moscow Olympics

James Alexander Ivey

10. Barbarians, Bridge Builders, and Boycott: The British Sports Council’s Fact-Finding Mission to South Africa

Toby C. Rider and Matthew P. Llewellyn

11. Fractured Fandom and Paradoxical Passions: Explaining Support for New Zealand All Black Rugby Teams in South Africa, 1960–2018

Marizanne Grundlingh and Albert Grundlingh

12. Beyond Master Narratives: Local Sources and Global Perspectives on Sport, Apartheid, and Liberation

Peter Alegi

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Editor(s)

Biography

Michelle M. Sikes is Assistant Professor in the Departments of Kinesiology, African Studies, and History at Pennsylvania State University. She received her D.Phil. from the University of Oxford. Prior to coming to Penn State, Michelle held positions at the University of Cape Town and Stellenbosch University in South Africa.

Toby C. Rider is Associate Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at California State University, Fullerton. He is the author of Cold War Games: Propaganda, the Olympics, and U.S. Foreign Policy (University of Illinois Press, 2016), and the co-director of the Center for Sociocultural Sport and Olympic Research.

Matthew P. Llewellyn is Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at California State University, Fullerton. Matt has successfully published over 40 papers in refereed journals and is the author of The Decline and Fall of Olympic Amateurism (University of Illinois Press, 2016). He is currently the co-director of the Center for Sociocultural Sport and Olympic Research.