State Crime: 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

State Crime

1st Edition

Edited by William Chambliss, Chris Moloney

Routledge

1,594 pages

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Hardback: 9780415835541
pub: 2014-09-15
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Description

In modern times, the most egregious crimes are undoubtedly those committed, incited, or condoned by states (as well as by de facto authorities exerting political and military control over a substantial territory, such as FARC in Colombia). Indeed, both within and without the academy, there is a growing realization that state criminality is endemic, and acts as a significant barrier to global security and development.

Now, to make some sense of this flourishing site of research, and to understand the wide range of approaches and complex theories that have informed thinking in this area, Routledge announces a new title in its acclaimed Critical Concepts in Criminology series. Edited by leading scholars with an international reputation, State Crime is a definitive, four-volume collection of cutting-edge and foundational research.

Topics covered include:

  • genocide and other forms of politically organized mass killing;
  • war crimes;
  • crimes of empire and state terror;
  • state-corporate crime; and
  • state-organized crime and political and economic corruption.

This vital Routledge collection brings together the major works on state crime. It will be welcomed not just by criminologists, but also by practising lawyers, philosophers, and thinkers in related disciplines.

Table of Contents

Volume I: State Crime

Part 1: Theoretical and Empirical Foundations of State-Crime Research

1. L. Proall, Political Crime (D. Appleton & Company, 1898) (extracts).

2. E. H. Sutherland, ‘White-Collar Criminality’, American Sociological Review, 1940, 5, 1, 1–12.

3. M. B. Clinard, ‘Criminological Theories of Violations of Wartime Regulations’, American Sociological Review, 1946, 11, 3, 258–70.

4. R. A. Falk, ‘The Shimoda Case: A Legal Appraisal of the Atomic Attacks Upon Hiroshima and Nagasaki’, American Journal of International Law, 1965, 59, 4, 759–93.

5. H. Schwendinger and J. Schwendinger, ‘Defenders of Order or Guardians of Human Rights?’, Issues in Criminology, 1970, 5, 2, 123–57.

6. L. S. Schrager and J. F. Short. Jr., ‘Toward a Sociology of Organizational Crime’, Social Problems, 1978, 25, 4, 407–19.

7. W. J. Chambliss, ‘State-Organized Crime: The American Society of Criminology, 1988 Presidential Address’, Criminology, 1988, 27, 2, 183–208.

8. G. Barak, ‘Crime, Criminology and Human Rights’, Journal of Human Justice, 1990, 2, 1, 11–28.

Part 2: Conceptual Matters in the Study of State Crime

9. P. Green and T. Ward, ‘Defining the State as Criminal’, in Penny Green and Tony Ward (eds.), State Crime: Governments, Violence and Corruption (Pluto Press, 2004), pp. 1–10.

10. R. Michalowski, ‘In Search of "State and Crime" in State Crime Studies’, in William J. Chambliss, Raymond Michalowski, and Ronald C. Kramer (eds.), State Crime in the Global Age (Willan Publishing, 2010), pp. 13–30.

11. D. L. Rothe, ‘Laws Prohibiting the Most Deleterious Acts of State Criminality’, State Criminality: The Crime of all Crimes (Lexington Books, 2009), pp. 29–47.

12. P. Hillyard and S. Tombs ‘From "Crime" to Social Harm?’, Crime, Law and Social Change, 2007, 48, 9–25.

13. Rick A. Matthews and D. Kauzlarich, ‘State Crimes and State Harms: A Tale of Two Definitional Frameworks’, Crime, Law and Social Change, 2007, 48, 43–55.

14. D. L. Rothe and D. O. Friedrichs, ‘The State of the Criminology of Crimes of the State’, Social Justice, 2006, 33, 1, 147–61.

Volume II: Varieties of State Crime

Part 1: War, Terror, and Assassinations

15. R. C. Kramer and R. J. Michalowski, ‘War, Aggression and State Crime’, British Journal of Criminology, 45, 2005, 446–69.

16. L. Dawn Rothe and Jeffrey Ian Ross, ‘Dronefare: The Normality of Governance and State Crime’ (2013) (first published in this collection).

17. M. Stohl, ‘International Dimensions of State Terrorism’, in Michael Stohl and George A. Lopez (eds.), The State as Terrorist (Greenwood Press, 1984), pp. 43–58.

18. C. Card, ‘Rape as a Weapon of War’, Hypatia, 1996, 11, 4, 5–18.

19. M. S. Hamm, ‘State-Organized Homicide: A Study of 7 CIA Plans to Assassinate Fidel Castro’, in William J. Chambliss and Marjorie S. Zatz (eds.), Making Law: The State, The Law, and Structural Contradictions (Indiana University Press, 1993), pp. 315–43.

20. A. W. McCoy, ‘The CIA’s Covert Wars’, in Alfred W. McCoy (ed.), The Politics of Heroin: CIA Complicity in the Global Drug Trade (Lawrence Hill Books, 2003), pp. 461–531.

Part 2: Genocide and Other Human-Rights Violations

21. D. O. Friedrichs, ‘The Crime of the Century? The Case for the Holocaust’, Crime, Law and Social Change, 2000, 34, 21–41.

22. C. W. Mullins and Dawn L. Rothe, ‘The Forgotten Ones: The Darfuri Genocide’, Critical Criminology, 2007, 15, 135–58.

23. E. Lenning, ‘Execution for Body Parts: A Case of State Crime’, Contemporary Justice Review, 2007, 10, 2, 173–91.

24. K. Hoofnagle, ‘Burundi: A History of Conflict and State Crime’, in Dawn L. Rothe and Christopher W. Mullins (eds.), State Crime: Current Perspectives (Rutgers University Press, 2011), pp. 142–61.

25. E. Lenning and S. Brightman, ‘Oil, Rape and State Crime in Nigeria’, Critical Criminology, 2009, 17, 35–48.

26. S. D. Westervelt and K. J. Cook, ‘Framing Innocents: The Wrongly Convicted as Victims of State Harm’, Crime, Law and Social Change, 2010, 53, 259–75.

27. S. Cohen, ‘Human Rights and Crimes of the State: The Culture of Denial’, Australia & New Zealand Journal of Criminology, 1993, 26, 97–115.

28. Penny Green and Tony Ward, ‘Human Rights, Civil Society and State Crime: Burma, Tunisia …’ (2013) (first published in this collection).

Part 3: State Crime and Politics, Finance and Globalization

29. Nubia Evertsson, ‘Political Corruption as a Form of State Crime: A Case Study on Electoral Donations’ (2013) (first published in this collection).

30. M. Israel ‘Crimes of the State: Victimisation of South African Political Exiles in the United Kingdom’, Crime, Law and Social Change, 1998, 29, 1–29.

31. S. Henry, ‘The Informal Economy: A Crime of Omission by the State’, in Gregg Barak (ed.), Crimes by the Capitalist State (SUNY Albany Press, 1991), pp. 253–70.

32. S. Mackenzie, ‘Systematic Crimes of the Powerful: Criminal Aspects of the Global Economy’, Social Justice, 2006, 33, 1, 162–82.

33. D. L. Rothe, C. W. Mullins, and K. Sandstrom, ‘The Rwandan Genocide: International Finance Policies and Human Rights’, Social Justice, 2008, 35, 3, 66–86.

34. D. O. Friedrichs and J. Friedrichs, ‘The World Bank and Crimes of Globalization: A Case Study’, Social Justice, 2002, 29, 1–2, 13–36.

35. I. Ezeonu and E. Koku, ‘Crimes of Globalization: The Feminization of HIV Pandemic in Sub-Saharan Africa’, The Global South, 2008, 2, 2, 112–29.

Part 4: State-Corporate Crimes

36. R. C. Krame, R. J. Michalowski, and D. Kauzlarich, ‘The Origins and Development of the Concept and Theory of State-Corporate Crime’, Crime & Delinquency, 2002, 48, 2, 263–82.

37. N. A. Wonders, M. J. Danner, ‘Globalization, State-Corporate Crime and Women’, in Raymond J. Michalowski and Ronald C. Kramer (eds.), State Corporate Crime (Rutgers University Press, 2006), pp. 98–115.

38. O. H. Griffin III and B. L. Miller, ‘Oxycontin and a Regulation Deficiency of the Pharmaceutical Industry: Rethinking State-Corporate Crime’, Critical Criminology, 2011, 19, 213–26.

39. D. Whyte, ‘Lethal Regulation: State-Corporate Crime and the United Kingdom Government’s New Mercenaries’, Journal of Law and Society, 2003, 30, 4, 575–600.

40. M. Welch, ‘Fragmented Power and State-Corporate Killings: A Critique of Blackwater in Iraq’, Crime, Law and Social Change, 2009, 51, 351–64.

41. M. J. Lynch, R. G. Burns, and P. B. Stretesky, ‘Global Warming and State-Corporate Crime: The Politicization of Global Warming Under the Bush Administration’, Crime, Law and Social Change, 2010, 54, 213–39.

42. R. C. Kramer, ‘Carbon in the Atmosphere and Power in America: Climate Change as State-Corporate Crime’, Journal of Crime and Justice, 2013, 36, 2, 153–70.

Part 5: State Crime, Natural Resources, Natural Disasters, the Environment, and Indigenous Peoples

43. C. J. Moloney and W. J. Chambliss, ‘Slaughtering the Bison, Controlling Native Americans: A State Crime and Green Criminology Synthesis’, Critical Criminology, 2014 (in press).

44. P. Green, T. Ward, K. McConnachie, ‘Logging and Legality: Environmental Crime, Civil Society, and the State’, Social Justice, 2007, 34, 2, 94–110.

45. R. Walters, ‘Crime, Bio-Agriculture and the Exploitation of Hunger’, British Journal of Criminology, 2006, 46, 26–45.

46. R. White, ‘Depleted Uranium, State Crime and the Politics of Knowing’, Theoretical Criminology, 2008, 12, 1, 31–54.

47. P. Green, ‘Disaster by Design: Corruption, Construction and Catastrophe’, British Journal of Criminology, 2005, 45, 528–46.

48. K. L. Faust and D. Kauzlarich, ‘Hurricane Katrina Victimization as a State Crime of Omission’, Critical Criminology, 2008, 16, 85–103.

49. C. Cunneen, ‘The Race to Defraud: State Crime and the Immiseration of Indigenous People’, State Crime and Resistance (Routledge, 2012), pp. 99–113.

50. L. Robyn, ‘Violations of Treaty Rights’, in Raymond J. Michalowski and Ronald Kramer (eds.), State-Corporate Crime (Rutgers University Press, 2006), pp. 186–98.

51. K. M. Hazlehurst, ‘Passion and Policy: Aboriginal Deaths in Custody in Australia 1980–1989’, in Gregg Barak (ed.), Crimes by the Capitalist State (SUNY Albany Press, 1991), pp. 20–47.

52. C. W. Mullins and D. Kauzlarich, ‘The Ghost Dance and Wounded Knee: A Criminological Examination’, Social Pathology, 2000, 6, 4, 264–83.

Volume III: Teaching, Researching, and Explaining State Crime

Part 1: Teaching and Researching State Crime

53. D. L. Rothe and J. I. Ross, ‘The Marginalization of State Crime in Introductory Textbooks on Criminology’, Critical Sociology, 2008, 34, 5, 741–52.

54. D. L. Rothe and J. I. Ross, ‘Lights, Camera, State Crime’ , Journal of Criminal Justice and Popular Culture, 2007, 14, 4, 330–43.

55. V. E. Collins, A. L. Farrell, J. R. McKee, F. A. Martin, E. Monk-Turner, ‘The State of Coverage: The Media’s Representation of International Issues and State Crime’, International Criminal Justice Review, 2011, 21, 1, 5–21.

56. M. Grewcock, ‘Public Criminology, Victim Agency and Researching State Crime’, State Crime, 2012, 1, 1, 109–25.

57. E. Stanley, ‘Interviewing Victims of State Violence’, in David Gadd, Susanne Karstedt, and Steven F. Messner (eds.), The Sage Handbook of Criminological Research Methods (Sage, 2012), pp. 231–43.

Part 2: Explaining State Crime

58. D. L. Rothe and C. W. Mullins, ‘Toward a Criminology of International Criminal Law: An Integrated Theory of International Criminal Violations’, International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice, 2009, 33, 1, 98–117.

59. M. J. Lynch, M. A. Long, and Paul B. Stretesky, ‘Add Parsimony and Stir … Exploring the Explanation of State Crime’, American Journal of Criminal Justice, 2013, 38, 99–118.

60. A. Sabuktay, ‘Locating Extra-Legal Activities of the Modern State in Legal-Political Theory: Weber, Habermas, Kelsen, Schmitt and Turk’, Crime, Law and Social Change, 2009, 51, 511–30.

61. P. Green and T. Ward, ‘The Political Economy of State Crime’, in Penny Green and Tony Ward (eds.), State Crime (Pluto Press, 2004), pp. 185–93.

62. D. Kauzlarich, R. A. Matthews, and William J. Miller, ‘Toward A Victimology of State Crime’, Critical Criminology, 2000, 10, 173–94.

63. T. Ward and P. Green, ‘Legitimacy, Civil Society and State Crime’, Social Justice, 2000, 27, 4, 76–92.

64. D. Kauzlarich, C. W. Mullins, and R. A. Matthews, ‘A Complicity Continuum of State Crime’, Contemporary Justice Review, 2003, 6, 3, 241–54.

Volume IV: Confronting State Crime and the Future of State Crime Research

Part 1: Controlling State Crime

65. D. L. Rothe, ‘Complementary and Alternative Domestic Responses to State Crime’, in Dawn L. Rothe and Christopher W. Mullins (eds.), State Crime: Current Perspectives (Rutgers University Press, 2011), pp. 198–218.

66. J. I. Ross, ‘Controlling State Crime: Toward an Integrated Structural Model’, in Jeffrey Ian Ross (ed.), Controlling State Crime, 2nd edn. (Garland Publishing, 2000), pp. 3–33.

67. C. W. Mullins, D. Kauzlarich, and D. Rothe, ‘The International Criminal Court and the Control of State Crime: Prospects and Problems’, Critical Criminology, 2004, 12, 285–308.

68. R. Michalowski, ‘The Master’s Tools: Can Supranational Law Confront Crimes of Powerful States’, in Elizabeth Stanley and Jude McCulloch (eds.), State Crime and Resistance (Routledge, 2013), pp. 211–24.

69. E. Stanley, ‘Truth Commissions and the Recognition of State Crime’, British Journal of Criminology, 2005, 45, 582–97.

70. B. Martin, ‘Eliminating State Crime by Abolishing the State’, in Jeffrey Ian Ross (ed.), Controlling State Crime, 2nd edn. (Garland Publishing, 2000), pp. 389–417.

Part 2: Resisting State Crime

71. E. Stanley and J. McCulloch ‘Resistance to State Crime’, in Elizabeth Stanley and Jude McCulloch (eds.), State Crime and Resistance (Routledge, 2013), pp. 1–13.

72. G. Barak, ‘Resisting State Criminality and the Struggle for Justice’, in Gregg Barak (ed.), Crimes by the Capitalist State (SUNY Albany Press, 1991), pp. 273–81.

73. R. White, ‘Environmental Activism and Resistance to State-Corporate Crime’, in Elizabeth Stanley and Jude McCulloch (eds.), State Crime and Resistance (Routledge, 2013), pp. 128–40.

Part 3: The Future of State Crime Research

74. D. L. Rothe, J. I. Ross, C. W. Mullins, D. Friedrichs, R. Michalowski, G. Barak, D. Kauzlarich, and R. C. Kramer, ‘That was Then, This is Now, What About Tomorrow? Future Directions in State Crime Studies’, Critical Criminology, 2009, 17, 3–13.

75. D. O. Friedrichs, ‘Toward a Prospective Criminology of State Crime’, in William J. Chambliss, Raymond J. Michalowski, and Ronald C. Kramer (eds.), State Crime in the Global Age (Willan Publishing, 2010), pp. 67–80.

76. R. C. Kramer, R. Michalowski, and W. J. Chambliss, ‘Epilogue: Toward a Public Criminology of State Crime’, in William J. Chambliss, Raymond J. Michalowski, and Ronald C. Kramer (eds.), State Crime in the Global Age (Willan Publishing, 2010), pp. 247–61.

About the Editors

Edited and with a new introduction by William Chambliss, the George Washington University, USA; and Chris Moloney, Colorado State University, USA

About the Series

Critical Concepts in Criminology

Edited and introduced by leading experts in the field, Routledge’s Major Works collections are designed to meet today’s research, reference, and teaching needs. The Critical Concepts in Criminology series includes a number of titles within the subject area of Crime and Criminal Justice. An area of interest with a fast expanding body of literature, titles within this series provide an authoritative look at some of the key areas of interest within Criminology.

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
SOC026000
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Sociology / General