Terrorism, Rights and the Rule of Law: 1st Edition (Paperback) book cover

Terrorism, Rights and the Rule of Law

1st Edition

By Barry Vaughan, Shane Kilcommins

Willan

242 pages

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Paperback: 9781843922643
pub: 2007-12-01
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pub: 2007-12-01
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pub: 2013-05-13
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Description

The rule of law is becoming a victim of the struggle against terrorism. Many countries are reviewing their security procedures and questioning whether due process rights hinder them in the war on terror. There is increasing emphasis on preventive detention or strategies of disablement that cut into the liberties of suspects who may not have committed a crime. The focus of this book is the Republic of Ireland, where the risk of political violence has constantly threatened the Irish state. To ensure its survival, the state has resorted to emergency laws that weaken due process rights. The effects of counter-terrorism campaigns upon the rule of law governing criminal justice in Ireland are a central feature of this book. Globalization has supported this crossover, as organized crime seems immune to conventional policing tactics. But globalization fragments the authority of the state by introducing a new justice network. New regulatory agencies are entrusted with powers to control novel risks and social movements adopt a human rights discourse to contest state power and emergency laws. The result of this conflux of actors and risks is are negotiation of the model of justice that citizens can expect. Terrorism, Rights and the Rule of Law contributes to current debates about civil liberties in the war on terror, how counter-terrorism can contaminate criminal justice, and how globalization challenges a state-centred view of criminal justice. It will be of key interest to students of criminology, law, human rights and sociology,as well as legal and other practitioners and policy-makers.

Table of Contents

Contents Introduction 1 Ending or extending the long nineteenth century of criminal justice 2 Justice, rights and reciprocity 3 Reconstructing truth in criminal law: Moving from an exculpatory to an inculpatory model of justice 4 Law in the shadow of the gunman 5 Entrenching the 'equality of arms' framework in the ordinary criminal justice system in Ireland 6 Disaggregated justice 7 Justice beyond the nation state 8 Conclusion: The war on terror and campaigns for rights Notes References and further reading Index

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
SOC004000
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Criminology