The Concise Encyclopedia of Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain: 1st Edition (Paperback) book cover

The Concise Encyclopedia of Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain

1st Edition

By Roberto Patarca Montero

CRC Press

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Paperback: 9780789015280
pub: 2002-07-22
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Description

An A-to-Z look at these crippling disorders!

Compiled by one of the foremost researchers in the field of immunology, The Concise Encyclopedia of Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain is an A-to-Z summary of current knowledge that updates patients and health care professionals on these disabling clinical disorders. This vital information has been organized in an easy-to-use format that lets you become familiar with highlights of the most relevant topics.

The Concise Encyclopedia of Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain gives you immediate access to the latest advances in rheumatology, cardiovascular medicine, endocrinology, epidemiology, immunology, infectious diseases, neurology, psychiatry, and psychology that form the basis for new lines of research and therapeutic intervention. This comprehensive reference summarizes information published mainly in the last decade, providing a thoughtful and balanced resource that will educate and increase awareness of these often-misdiagnosed disorders.

The Concise Encyclopedia of Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain allows easy access to:

  • relevant case study findings, summarized to provide the answers you need
  • evidence-based alternative medicine approaches
  • pertinent findings on related disorders
  • an extensive bibliography

    Comprehensive and thorough, The Concise Encyclopedia of Fibromyalgia and Myofascial Pain gives you the information you’ve been looking for on these painful disorders that affect more than six million Americans. This important book gives health care professionals a greater understanding and awareness of fibromyalgia and myofascial pain and gives patients help at their fingertips.

Table of Contents

  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1. Molecular Recognition Processes Between Plant and Bacterial Pathogens
  • Introduction
  • Physical Contact of Plant Cells is Necessary for Bacterial Recognition
  • Molecules Responsible for Physical Contact
  • Many Bacterial Pathogens Induce Necrosis on Hosts and Nonhosts
  • Bacterial Pathogens Grow in Both Host and Nonhost Plants
  • Bacterial Pathogens Induce Leakage of Nutrients in Both Host and Nonhost Plants
  • Bacterial Genes Involved in Recognition of Hosts and Nonhosts
  • Coregulation of hrp, avr and Other Pathogenicity Genes
  • Transcription of Bacterial Pathogenicity Genes in Planta
  • Plant-Derived Molecules May Be Involved in Induction of Bacterial Genes
  • Some Plant Signals May Direct Synthesis of Elicitors
  • Secretion of Elicitors From Bacterial Cells in Plants
  • The Role of hrp and avr Genes in Early Recognition Process in Plant-Bacterial Pathogen Interactions
  • Other Signal Molecules of Bacterial Pathogens
  • The Signal Transduction System
  • Systemic Signal Induction
  • Is Cell Death Involved in Signal Transduction Pathway?
  • How Pathogens Avoid or Overcome Host Defense Mechanisms Induced by the Signal Transduction System?
  • Possible Role of Signal Transduction System in Evasion of Host Recognition by Phytopathogenic Bacteria During Pathogenesis
  • Conclusion
  • Chapter 2. Host Defense Mechanisms: Cell Wall?the First Barrier and a Source of Defense Signal Molecules
  • The First Barrier to Bacterial Infection in Plants
  • Structure of the Plant Cell Wall
  • Pectic Polysaccharides
  • Cellulose
  • Hemicellulos
  • Cell Wall Proteins
  • Bacterial Genes Encoding Extracellular Enzymes
  • Bacterial Genes Regulating Production of Extracellular Enzymes
  • Bacterial Genes Regulating Secretion of Extracellular Enzymes
  • Secretion of Proteases
  • The Signaling System in Induction of Bacterial Extracellular Enzymes
  • Plant Cell Wall Components Involved in Defense Mechanisms Against Bacterial Pathogens
  • Bacterial Extracellular Enzymes Induce Host Defense Mechanisms
  • Pectic Fragments Induce Virulence Genes in Bacterial and Defense Genes in Plants
  • Pectic Enzymes Vary in Inducing Resistance or Susceptibility
  • Polygalacturonase-Inhibiting Proteins
  • Cell Wall Modifications and Bacterial Disease Resistance
  • Conclusion
  • Chapter 3. Active Oxygen Species
  • Mechanism of Production of Active Oxygen Species
  • Signals for Induction of Active Oxygen Species in Bacteria-Infected Plants
  • Bacterial Infection Leads to Production of Active Oxygen Species in Plants
  • Active Oxygen Species May Induce Lipid Peroxidation
  • Increases in Active Oxygen Species Lead to Activation of Lipoxygenase
  • Active Oxygen Species Production Leads to Cell Membrane Damage
  • Active Oxygen Species May Directly Kill Bacterial Pathogens
  • Bacterial Pathogens May Tolerate Toxicity of Active Oxygen Species
  • Antioxidants of the Host May Protect Bacterial Pathogens Against Active Oxygen Species
  • The Possible Role of Active Oxygen Species in Disease Resistance
  • Conclusion
  • Chapter 4. Inducible Plant Proteins
  • Introduction
  • Nomenclature of Pathogen-Inducible Plant Proteins
  • Occurrence of PR Proteins in Various Plants
  • Classification of PR Proteins
  • Bacterial Pathogens Induce PR Proteins
  • Molecular Mechanisms of Induction of PR Proteins
  • Compartmentalization of PR Proteins in Plant Tissues
  • The Role of PR Proteins in Bacterial Disease Resistance
  • The Second Group of Pathogen-Inducible Proteins: Constitutive, but Increasingly Induced
  • Hydroxyproline-Rich Glycoproteins
  • Lectins
  • Not All Inducible Proteins Need Be Involved in Inducing Bacterial Disease Resistance
  • Conclusion
  • Chapter 5. Inducible Secondary Metabolites
  • What Are Inducible Secondary Metabolites?
  • Bacterial Pathogens Induce Accumulation of Secondary Metabolites in Infected Tissues
  • Phytoalexins Accumulate in Plants After Irreversible Cell Membrane Damage
  • Phytoalexins Accumulate Only Locally and Not Systemically
  • Mode of Syntheses of Phytoalexins
  • Evidences That Induced Secondary Metabolites Are Involved in Bacterial Disease Resistance
  • Phytoalexins May Be Suppressed, Degraded, or Inactivated in Susceptible Interactions
  • Some Phytoalexins May Not Have Any Role in Disease Resistance
  • Constitutive, but Induced Secondary Metabolites During Pathogenesis
  • Conclusion
  • Chapter 6. Biotechnological Applications: Molecular Manipulation of Bacterial Disease Resistance
  • Introduction
  • Manipulation of Signal Transduction System for Induction of Disease Resistance
  • Manipulation of Resistance Genes Involved in Signal Transduction System
  • Manipulation of Signal Transduction System by Elicitors
  • Manipulation of Signal Transduction System by Using Chemicals
  • Manipulation of Signal Transduction System by Using Rhizobacterial Strains
  • Manipulation of Signal Transduction System by Enhanced Biosynthesis of Salicylic Acid
  • Manipulation of Signal Transduction System by Inducing Accelerated Cell Death
  • Manipulation of Signal Transduction System by Enhanced Biosynthesis of Cytokinins
  • Manipulation of Inducible Proteins for Induction of Bacterial Disease Resistance
  • Suppression of Virulence Factors of Bacterial Pathogens to Manage Bacterial Diseases
  • Exploitation of Insect Genes Encoding Antibacterial Proteins for Bacterial Disease Management
  • Exploitation of Bacteriophage Genes for Bacterial Disease Management
  • Exploitation of Genes from Human Beings, Hens, and Crabs for Management of Plant Bacterial Diseases
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
HEA036000
HEALTH & FITNESS / Pain Management
MED056000
MEDICAL / Neurology