The Economics of Property and Planning : Future Value book cover
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The Economics of Property and Planning
Future Value




  • Available for pre-order. Item will ship after November 30, 2021
ISBN 9780367629670
November 30, 2021 Forthcoming by Routledge
264 Pages 31 B/W Illustrations

 
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Book Description

This book introduces the interlocking disciplines of property and planning to economic theory and practice.

Unlike any other available textbook, The Economics of Property and Planning skilfully introduces the reader to the interplay between property and planning using an economic lens. As resources become scarce, there is a growing need for students to understand the principles of economics in property and planning. Especially given the rapid social, environmental, technological and political changes that are shaping places.

The book begins with an outline of key economists and economic problems, then resources and scarcity, before examining macro and micro economic factors at play in property and planning. Furthermore, the book covers a variety of topics including spatial and locational modelling, fiscal approaches to redistribution, regeneration and renewal, and transport and infrastructure financing. There is also particular focus on contemporary issues such as climate change, environmental limits to economic growth, sustainability and resilience, and affordable housing. The book also introduces practical evaluation tools and appraisal. Plus a look at property and planning with respect to macro-economic objectives, policy, and new directions.

With property and planning essential factors in economic thinking and doing, this book provides insight into what future places will look like in real terms and how they will be shaped by policy. Targeted disciplines for the book include Economics, Planning, Property, Construction, Geography, Environmental Management, Sustainability, Housing, Built Environment, Land Economy, Urban Studies, Regional Studies, and Public Policy.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction to Future Value: The Economics of Property and Planning  2. Economists and Economic Problems in Property and Planning  3. Resources and Scarcity in Property and Planning  4. Microeconomics in The Economics of Property and Planning  5. Macroeconomics in The Economics of Property and Planning  6. Spatial and Locational Economic Approaches to Property and Planning  7. Market Failure, Externalities and Efficiencies in Property and Planning  8. Housing and Neighbourhood Economics in Property and Planning  9. Fiscal and Value Capture Mechanisms in Property and Planning  10. Infrastructure Economics in Property and Planning  11. The Economics of Climate Change, Sustainability, and Resilience in Property and Planning  12. Measuring Value in the Economics of Property and Planning  13. Policy and New Directions in The Economics of Property and Planning

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Author(s)

Biography

Professor Graham Squires is an International Economist, Geographer, and Planner with expertise in Property and Housing. He is the author of 6 books and has written over 100 peer-review journals, conference papers, grant-funded reports, and book chapters. Graham is a Professor in The School of Economics and Finance at Massey University, New Zealand. He has lectured in the United Kingdom at The University of Manchester, UWE Bristol, and Birmingham University. He has been a visiting scholar at the University of California Berkeley, University of Illinois, and Delft University. Graham is President-Elect of the Pacific Rim Real Estate Society (PRRES), and Council Member of the New Zealand Association of Economists (NZAE). He is a Fulbright Scholar, CEO of The Property Foundation, and Member of The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (MRICS).

Reviews

"At the interplay between property and planning using an economic lens, this text forms a novel approach in seeking to expose the student to complementarities between these disciplines" - Professor Stanley McGreal, Ulster University, Northern Ireland