The Evolution of Migration Management in the Global North (Hardback) book cover

The Evolution of Migration Management in the Global North

By Christina Oelgemöller

© 2017 – Routledge

196 pages | 4 B/W Illus.

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Hardback: 9781138185340
pub: 2017-03-07
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Description

The Evolution of Migration Management in the Global North explores how the radically violent migration management paradigm that dominates today's international migration has been assembled. Drawing on unique archive material, it shows how a forum of diplomats and civil servants constructed the 'transit country' as a site in which the illegal migrant became the main actor to be vilified. Policy-makers are divided between those who oppose migration, and those who support it, so long as it is properly managed. Any other position is generally seen at best as utopian.

This volume advances a new way of conceptualizing policy-making in international migration at the regional and international level. Introducing the concept of 'informal plurilateralism', Oelgemöller explores how the Inter-Governmental Consultations on Asylum, Migration and Refugees (IGC), created the hegemonic paradigm of 'Migration Management', thus enabling today's specific ways the 'migrant' has their juridico-political status violently denied. This raises crucial questions about what democracy is and about the way in which the value of a human being is established, granted or denied.

Inviting debate in a field which is often under-theorized, this work will be of great interest to students and scholars of International Relations, Migration Studies and International Relations Theory.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Part One: Migration Management as contested yet normalized discourse

1 Migration Management as guiding typology of policy practice

2 The migration nexi

Conclusion to Part One

Part Two: The emergence of Migration Management as recorded by the IGC

3 Geopolitical ruptures

4 The IGC’s informal plurilateralism

Conclusion to Part Two

Part Three: Ethico-political evaluation of Migration Management

5 Technocracy: banality of evil?

6 The generative potential of suspension

Conclusion to Part Three

Conclusion: Migration Management – disagreeing with violence and consensus-democracyAppendix 1: IGC documents cited

About the Author

Christina Oelgemöller is a Lecturer in International Relations in the Department of Politics, History and International Relations at Loughborough University, UK.

About the Series

Interventions

The Series provides a forum for innovative and interdisciplinary work that engages with alternative critical, post-structural, feminist, postcolonial, psychoanalytic and cultural approaches to international relations and global politics. In our first 5 years we have published 60 volumes.

We aim to advance understanding of the key areas in which scholars working within broad critical post-structural traditions have chosen to make their interventions, and to present innovative analyses of important topics. Titles in the series engage with critical thinkers in philosophy, sociology, politics and other disciplines and provide situated historical, empirical and textual studies in international politics.

 

We are very happy to discuss your ideas at any stage of the project: just contact us for advice or proposal guidelines. Proposals should be submitted directly to the Series Editors:

  • Jenny Edkins (jennyedkins@hotmail.com) and
  • Nick Vaughan-Williams (N.Vaughan-Williams@Warwick.ac.uk).

‘As Michel Foucault has famously stated, "knowledge is not made for understanding; it is made for cutting" In this spirit The Edkins - Vaughan-Williams Interventions series solicits cutting edge, critical works that challenge mainstream understandings in international relations. It is the best place to contribute post disciplinary works that think rather than merely recognize and affirm the world recycled in IR's traditional geopolitical imaginary.’

Michael J. Shapiro, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, USA

 

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
POL000000
POLITICAL SCIENCE / General
POL003000
POLITICAL SCIENCE / Civics & Citizenship
POL011000
POLITICAL SCIENCE / International Relations / General
POL015000
POLITICAL SCIENCE / Political Process / Political Parties
POL016000
POLITICAL SCIENCE / Political Process / General