The Letters of Philip Webb: 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

The Letters of Philip Webb

1st Edition

By John Aplin

Routledge

1,456 pages

Purchasing Options:$ = USD
Hardback: 9781848934986
pub: 2015-12-18
$705.00
x

FREE Standard Shipping!

Description

Philip Webb was a British architect known as a founder of the Arts and Crafts movement and also a key member of the Pre-Raphaelite circle. He had a long association with William Morris and was responsible for the design of the hugely influential Red House, Morris’s first home.

In this collection, Philip Webb’s letters have been drawn together by John Aplin. They tell a fascinating story of Webb’s life and work, and the corresponding notes to each text will help the reader to understand the meaning and context of the letters. This work will be of interest to art and architecture historians alike.

Reviews

"These 1100 letters from 1864-1914 are a fascinating insight into the life of a quiet, generous man. Comprehensive footnotes give context to the correspondence and the index, always vital in collections of this sort, is full and helpful."

- Penny Lyndon, The Journal of William Morris Studies

"Philip Webb's letters are endlessly informative and enjoyable, but John Aplin's footnotes are themselves a delight. Never over-intrusive, they are nevertheless an important contribution to scholarship."

- Peter Burman, SPAB, Autumn 2016

"John Aplin has made a selection of 1,120 of Webb's letters […] They give not only fascinating insight into his work and principles, but also a vivid impression of his admirable character […] Their publication is an important contribution to our knowledge of the architectural and artistic history of the period covered. It forms an invaluable supplement to the biography by Lethaby (1935)"

- The Art Newspaper

Table of Contents

Volume I: 1864-1887

Volume II: 1888-1898

Volume III: 1899-1902

Volume IV: 1903-1914

About the Series

The Pickering Masters

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
ARC005070
ARCHITECTURE / History / Modern (late 19th Century to 1945)