1st Edition

The Routledge Handbook of Architecture, Urban Space and Politics, Volume II Ecology, Social Participation and Marginalities

Edited By Nikolina Bobic, Farzaneh Haghighi Copyright 2024
    700 Pages 100 B/W Illustrations
    by Routledge

    Architecture and the urban are connected to challenges around violence, security, race and ideology, spectacle and data. The first volume of this handbook extensively explored these oppressive roles. This second volume illustrates that escaping the corporatized and bureaucratized orders of power, techno-managerial and consumer-oriented capitalist economic models is more urgent and necessary than ever before. Herein lies the political role of architecture and urban space, including the ways through which they can be transformed and alternative political realities constituted. The volume explores the methods and spatial practices required to activate the political dimension and the possibility for alternative practices to operate in the existing oppressive systems while not being swallowed by these structures. Fostering new political consciousness is explored in terms of the following themes: Events and Dissidence; Biopolitics, Ethics and Desire; Climate and Ecology; Urban Commons and Social Participation; Marginalities and Postcolonialism. Volume II embraces engagement across disciplines and offers a wide range of projects and critical analyses across the so-called Global North and South. This multidisciplinary collection of 36 chapters provides the reader with an extensive resource of case studies and ways of thinking for architecture and urban space to become more emancipatory.

    1. Introduction: Ecologies of Resistance and Alternative Spatial Practices

    NIKOLINA BOBIC AND FARZANEH HAGHIGHI

    Part 1: Events and Dissidence

    2. Introduction to Events and Dissidence

    SABINE KNIERBEIN

    3. Concrete, Skateboarding and Building Community: The Battle for Venice Skatepark, Los Angeles

    IAIN BORDEN

    4. Re-Politicizing the Urban: Commoning Technicities in Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement

    GERHARD BRUYNS AND STAVROS KOUSOULAS

    5. A Common: The Architecture Lobby

    PEGGY DEAMER

    6. Waterfront/Battlefront: Vallejo’s Black Landscapes of Resistance Against Police and Environmental Violence

    JAVIER ARBONA AND JULIE SZE

    7. Urban Squatting, the Agency of Empty Buildings

    HANS PRUIJT

    8. Paper Architecture and Politics in the Late-Soviet Period

    ANDRES KURG

    Part 2: Biopolitics, Ethics and Desire

    9. Introduction to Biopolitics, Ethics and Desire

    ANDREW BALLANTYNE

    10. The Butcher of Nang Lerng: To Eat / To Speak Justice, and the Space of Becoming-Political

    STEPHEN LOO

    11. Desire and Micropolitical Architecture

    CHRIS L. SMITH

    12. Liking Like Likely: Applying Personality Traits Theory to the Design of Public Architecture

    SIMON WEIR AND NIKO TILIOPOULOS

    13. Practicing Ethics: Processes, Principles, Practices

    JANE RENDELL, YAEL PADAN, DAVID ROBERTS, WITH ARIANA MARKOWITZ AND EMMANUEL OSUTEYE

    14. The Surrounds: Configuring Urban Spaces Beyond Capture

    ABDOUMALIQ SIMONE

    Part 3: Climate and Ecology

    15. Introduction to Climate and Ecology

    DANIEL RYAN

    16. Mobile Commoning, Subversive Mobilities, Wayward Undercommons

    MIMI SHELLER

    17. Spatializing Queer Ecologies

    C. GREIG CRYSLER, YANIN KRAMSKY, CHANDRA M. LABORDE, AND STATHIS G. YEROS

    18. The Role of Circular Fashion Practice in Creative Placemaking and Place Identity

    SABINE LETTMANN

    19. Fast Slow: Prefabricated Architecture, DIY Earth Building, Personal and Planetary Wellbeing

    SARAH BREEN LOVETT, CATHY FITZGERALD, HARRISON GARDNER, DUNCAN MAXWELL, NIKOS PATEDAKIS, CATHY SMITH, AND LUCY WEIR

    20. New Architectural Eco-Politics Paradigm: Learning from Microbial Organisation as New Model of Domestic Infrastructure

    RACHEL ARMSTRONG

    21. Retrofitting in Context: Pushing the Boundaries of Building Performance Evaluation in UK Housing

    CHRISTOPHER TWEED AND JOANNE PATTERSON

    Part 4: Urban Commons and Social Participation

    22. Introduction to Urban Commons and Social Participation

    STAVROS STAVRIDES

    23. Skateboarding in Neoliberal Amman: Spatial Politics, Inclusivity and Infrastructuring 7hills Skatepark

    TOM CRITCHLEY AND JAKUB NOVOTNÝ

    24. Ageing and Architecture: From the Patient to the Citizen

    MARK HAMMOND AND CHRISTOPHER PHILLIPSON

    25. Semiotic Citizenship and the Politics of Shack-Building in Graaff-Reinet, South Africa

    SCOTT BURNETT AND AYLWYN M. WALSH

    26. A Triptych of Glitchy Linguistic Bots Co-Write Building and Planning Regulations

    LOREN ADAMS

    27. People’s Plan: The Political Role of Architecture and Urban Design for Alternative Community-Led Futures

    PABLO SENDRA AND DANIEL FITZPATRICK

    Part 5: Marginalities and Postcolonialism

    28. Introduction to Marginalities and Post-Colonialism

    MURRAY FRASER

    29. Indigenous Architecture and the Politics of Resistance: Waipapa Marae and the Fale Pasifika at the University of Auckland in New Zealand

    ALBERT L. REFITI, RAU HOSKINS AND TINA ENGELS SCHWARZPAUL

    30. Radical Placemaking: Digitally Situated Community Narratives as Inclusive Citymaking Practice

    KAVITA GONSALVES, MARCUS FOTH AND GLENDA CALDWELL

    31. Atlas Otherwise: Navigating Across Impermeable Surfaces and Shaky Grounds

    NISHAT NAZ AWAN

    32. Situating Ngũgĩ Wa Thiong’o’s Theatre and Its Afterlives

    MAKAU KITATA AND KENNY CUPERS

    33. The Hypnosis of the Belgrade Waterfront: Becoming Abnormal

    NIKOLINA BOBIC

    34. Prefigurative Feminist Practices of Democratic City–Making: Learning from Socialist Feminism and the Greater London Council (GLC)

    KIM TROGAL AND ANNA WAKEFORD HOLDER

    35. Necessary Transgressions in Architectural Education in Uganda

    MARK R.O. OLWENY

    36. Conclusion: Robots, AI and Spatial Politics: Unpacking Potentials

    DAGMAR REINHARDT

    Biography

    Dr Nikolina Bobic is an academic and an architect currently based at the University of Plymouth, UK. Her research is preoccupied with political constructs of architecture and urban space. Within this domain, and engaging with the two disciplines in which she is trained (architecture and sociology), she addresses the intersections of power, politics, and space in their oppressive and liberatory mechanisms.

    Dr Farzaneh Haghighi is a Senior Lecturer in Architecture in the School of Architecture and Planning, the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Her research interests revolve around the political role of space by drawing upon the intersection of political philosophy, architecture and urbanism.

    “Driven by a remarkable roster of emerging and established voices, this is a tremendous and definitive collection that seeks to make sense of how architecture can deliver positive outcomes for human experience, public urban life and improved social conditions in complex and subtly varying built environments. A massive new reference work, this is a dynamic and playful collection that weaves state of the art contributions across the fields of architecture, urban studies with others from related disciplines as they are brought into dialogue with questions of social vulnerability, interstitality and the accommodation of social fragility. This is a timely and enduring gift to students of the urban-social and physical condition.”

    Professor Rowland Atkinson, Chair in Inclusive Societies, University of Sheffield, UK

    “Since the dawn of modernity, the call for 'what is to be done' has been followed by prescriptions and occasionally manifestoes, proposing strategies to address the ongoing crisis project now reaching a global scale. Nikolina Bobic and Farzaneh Haghighi’s groundbreaking collection, a follow-up to their previous handbook, compiles essays, each presenting a close examination of diverse aspects of the power triangle, including the world financial machination, media technologies, and the rise of populist politics. Each chapter attempts to reveal the scaffolding of our contemporary global spectacle, transcending traditional town and country trajectories. What sets apart the book’s take on this rather timely project is a call for resistance against ecological issues and sustainability problems, integral to neoliberal economic and political system. Bobic and Haghighi aim at presenting a project of hope amidst forces attempting to ensnare the dialectics between architecture and the capitalistic modernization of the urban.”

    Gevork Hartoonian, Emeritus Professor of Architectural History, University of Canberra, Australia

    “The challenge of creating new architectural practices that do not reproduce previous oppressions is a daunting enterprise, but one that this volume takes on with fresh insights.  Surprises emerge by turning a critical eye on participatory design—a much needed critique—to new forms of dissent and collaboration that punctuate the 36 contributions from across the world and drawing upon multiple disciplines. Most importantly 'architectural' interventions and resistances are integrated into generating political theory as well as action, a feat that is difficult but crucial for the transformation in the world-making professions. Familiar concerns such as ecological sustainability, climate change, successful parks and waterfront urban development are reframed to reveal their critical potential through tracing the spatial politics of their social production. Spatial justice is a major theme and framework of analysis for reconsidering well-worn concepts such as the commons, communing and the common, and new concepts such as surrounds extend our vocabulary. The volume ends with a nod to the technological advances that might bring design closer to our everyday lives.”

    Dr Setha Low, Distinguished Professor - Psychology, Anthropology, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Women's and Gender Studies, The City University of New York, USA