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The Screen Music of Trevor Jones
Technology, Process, Production




ISBN 9781472473172
Published July 9, 2019 by Routledge
264 Pages 81 B/W Illustrations

 
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Book Description

The first significant publication devoted entirely to Trevor Jones’s work, The Screen Music of Trevor Jones: Technology, Process, Production, investigates the key phases of his career within the context of developments in the British and global screen-music industries. This book draws on the direct testimony of the composer and members of his team as well as making use of the full range of archival materials held in the University of Leeds’s unique Trevor Jones Archive, which was digitized with support from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Through a comprehensive series of chapters covering Jones’s early career to his recent projects, this book demonstrates how Jones has been active in an industry that has experienced a prolonged period of major technological change, including the switchover from analogue to digital production and post-production techniques, and developments in computer software for score production and sound recording/editing.

This is a valuable study for scholars, researchers and professionals in the areas of film music, film-score production and audio-visual media.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

List of Figures

List of Tables

Foreword by Trevor Jones

Acknowledgements

Introduction

Part One: Jones’s Early Career (1978–1987)

Chapter One: Musical Education and the National Film School

Chapter Two: Breaking into the Industry

Part Two: The ‘Toolkit’ Years (1987–1993)

Chapter Three: Alan Parker and the Development of the Toolkit

Chapter Four: Towards a Mainstream Sound

Part Three: Mainstream Scoring (1993–2004)

Chapter Five: Hollywood Blockbusters Part One

Chapter Six: Hollywood Blockbusters Part Two

Chapter Seven: Music for Television

Part Four: Recent Projects (2004–)

Chapter Eight: A Brief Foray into Video Games

Chapter Nine: Work in Diverse Areas of Screen Programming

Conclusions

Trevor Jones’s Filmography

Bibliography

Index

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Author(s)

Biography

David Cooper is Emeritus Professor of Music at the University of Leeds. He has published extensively on film music (especially that of Bernard Herrmann, Trevor Jones and Michael Nyman), the music of Béla Bartók and the traditional music of Ireland. His outputs include volumes on Herrmann’s scores for the films Vertigo and The Ghost and Mrs Muir; a major biography of Bartók and a study of the latter’s Concerto for Orchestra; and the monograph The Musical Traditions of Northern Ireland and Its Diaspora. He was principal investigator of the AHRC-funded project ‘The Professional Career and Output of Trevor Jones’.

Ian Sapiro is Associate Professor of Music at the University of Leeds. His monograph, Scoring the Score, is the first academic study of screen-music orchestration and orchestrators, and he has published on a range of screen-music and musical-theatre subjects. Outputs include a volume on Eshkeri’s score for Stardust and publications on John Williams’s orchestration, the film adaptations of Les Misérables and Annie, British ‘rock operas’ and Michael Nyman’s Greenaway scores, and he is currently working on a critical edition of the Gershwin musical Girl Crazy. He was co-investigator on the AHRC-funded project ‘The Professional Career and Output of Trevor Jones’.

Laura Anderson is an Irish Research Council Post-Doctoral Fellow at Maynooth University, where her project ‘Disruptive Soundscapes’ offers a new view of avant-garde post-war French film sound design by examining its relationship with wider cultural developments. Between 2013 and 2016, Laura was the Post-Doctoral Research Fellow on the AHRC-funded project, ‘The Professional Career and Output of Trevor Jones’ at the University of Leeds. Other projects include publications on Jean Cocteau’s engagement with music and sound in film; pre-existing music in Jean-Pierre Melville’s Les Enfants terribles; John Williams’s score for Angela’s Ashes; and Brian Boydell’s music for documentary film.