Thinking on Screen : Film as Philosophy book cover
1st Edition

Thinking on Screen
Film as Philosophy





ISBN 9780415774314
Published December 14, 2007 by Routledge
176 Pages

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Book Description

Thinking on Screen: Film as Philosophy is an accessible and thought-provoking examination of the way films raise and explore complex philosophical ideas. Written in a clear and engaging style, Thomas Wartenberg examines films’ ability to discuss, and even criticize ideas that have intrigued and puzzled philosophers over the centuries such as the nature of personhood, the basis of morality, and epistemological skepticism.

Beginning with a demonstration of how specific forms of philosophical discourse are presented cinematically, Wartenberg moves on to offer a systematic account of the ways in which specific films undertake the task of philosophy. Focusing on the films The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, Modern Times, The Matrix, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Third Man, The Flicker, and Empire, Wartenberg shows how these films express meaningful and pertinent philosophical ideas.

This book is essential reading for students of philosophy with an interest in film, aesthetics, and film theory. It will also be of interest to film enthusiasts intrigued by the philosophical implications of film.

Table of Contents

1. Can Philosophy Be Screened?  2. Film as Philosophy: The Local Strategy  3. Beyond Mere Illustration: Modern Times  4. Contemporary Skepticism: The Matrix  5. Against Utilitarianism: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind  6. Exploring Ethical Intelligence: The Third Man  7. Film as Displayed Movement: The Flicker  8. Conclusion  Appendix 1: Suggestions for Further Reading  Appendix 2: Suggestions for Further Viewing

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Author(s)

Biography

Thomas E. Wartenberg is Professor at Mount Holyoke College and author of Unlikely Couples: Movie Romance as Social Criticism. He has edited five anthologies of philosophy and film and is film editor for Philosophy Now.

Reviews

'A powerful defense of the view that films can philosophize. Characterized by its clear and lively presentation, and by its intertwining of philosophical argument with detailed discussion of several important films, it will be of interest not just to those studying philosophy and film but to everyone who believes in the importance of film to our cognitive life.' – Berys Gaut, University of St Andrews, UK