1st Edition

Trade And Transformation In Korea, 1876-1945





ISBN 9780813336305
Published October 6, 1998 by Routledge
252 Pages

USD $52.95

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Book Description

Exploring the interaction among system, state, and society, this book illuminates the social and economic history of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century colonial Korea. Dennis McNamara argues that transformation within and trade abroad, led by rice exports, spurred Korea's shift from isolation to inclusion in a modern regional system. In his chronicle of the bustling grain export center of Inchon, the author draws an engaging portrait of leading Korean brokers and their efforts to maintain autonomy while cooperating with Japanese grain millers.McNamara argues that Korean precedents of enterprise and guild association, coupled with Japanese colonial patterns of accommodation, fostered the emergence of modern Korean business. By focusing especially on the role of rice brokers and millers as important agents of change, this study advances our understanding of the formation of the Korean business community and offers valuable insights into the trade history of one of the world's leading export nations.

Table of Contents

List of Tables, Preface, Map of the Korean Peninsula, Abbreviations, Transitions, Market, State, and System, Argument, Trade, Empire, Trade from 1876, Colonial Trade, Conclusion, Trade Opponents, Empire, Polity, Market, Conclusion, Trade Advocates, Regional Order, State, Market, Conclusion, Chaegye, Mills and Merchants, Korean Chamber, Association, Conclusion, Zaikai, Mills and Merchants, Japanese Chamber, Grain Association, Conclusion, Exchange, Grain Exchange, Transfer Debate, Conclusion, Transformation, Incorporation, Embedded Ties, Legacies, Comparative Colonialism, Glossary, Bibliography: Asian Language, Bibliography: Western Language, Index, About the Book and Author

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Author(s)

Biography

Dennis L. McNamara is Y. H. Park Professor of Sociology and Korean Studies and chair of the Sociology Department at Georgetown University.