Transdisciplinary Journeys in the Anthropocene: More-than-human encounters, 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Transdisciplinary Journeys in the Anthropocene

More-than-human encounters, 1st Edition

By Kate Wright

Routledge

204 pages

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Description

Transdisciplinary Journeys in the Anthropocene offers a new perspective on international environmental scholarship, focusing on the emotional and affective connections between human and nonhuman lives to reveal fresh connections between global issues of climate change, species extinction and colonisation. Combining the rhythm of road travel, interviews with local Aboriginal Elders, and autobiographical storytelling, the book develops a new form of nature writing informed by concepts from posthumanism and the environmental humanities. It also highlights connections between the studied area and the global environment, drawing conceptual links between the auto-ethnographic accounts and international issues.

This book will be of great interest to scholars and postgraduates in environmental philosophy, cultural studies, postcolonial theory, Australian studies, anthropology, literary and place studies, ecocriticism, history and animal studies. Transdisciplinary Journeys in the Anthropocene may also be beneficial to studies in nature writing, ecocriticism, environmental literature, postcolonial studies and Australian studies.

Reviews

Storied places and companions infuse this deeply moving book of earthly encounters. This is not travel writing in any conventional sense, but home writing attuned to the bumptious motions of living and dying together of diverse human and nonhuman peoples. These are stories that can nurture response-abilities in our urgent times.

Donna Haraway, University of California Santa Cruz, USA

This book is a major contribution to the emerging field of the Environmental Humanities. It is a field founded on the idea that knowledge is forged on troubling journeys, not just applied to problems by masterful humans in order to extract solutions. Wright has invented a kind of subjectivity, with both a mode of knowledge composition, and a tone, that are crafted in interspecies relations. The Environmental Humanities are here relaunched on a new journey, generating hope through generous thought in a spirit of trust.

Stephen Muecke, University of New South Wales, Australia

Wright’s study is intimate and moving, a deeply personal account of her love for one particular place under the sun, even as she engages in a tough-minded, critical rethinking of her entanglement in a history permeated with genocidal and ecocidal legacies. We need a lot more studies like this one.

James Hatley, Salisbury University, Maryland, USA

Wright exemplifies the kind of imaginative intellectual thinking that we need right now to live in a world that depends upon relationality. Sure this book will make you think differently but it will also make you feel very, very connected!

Katrina Schlunke, University of Sydney, Australia

Table of Contents

Introduction

Part One. Stone County

Chapter 1. Standing Stones and Stratigraphic Time in the Anthropocene

Chapter 2. Encounters – A Road Trip through Stone Country

Part Two. Trees

Chapter 3. A Beloved Shadow Place

Chapter 4 Autumnal Becomings

Part Three. Animals

Chapter 5. Lucy

Chapter 6. Down the Rabbit Burrow

Part Four. Water

Chapter 7. Petrichor: Lessons from a Lost Gully

Part Five. Sky Country

Conclusion. Thinking Like a Storm

About the Author

Kate Wright is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of New England, Australia. She is currently immersed in an experimental, multispecies research project that involves developing and coordinating an Indigenous community garden in collaboration with Armidale’s Aboriginal community.

About the Series

Routledge Environmental Humanities

The Routledge Environmental Humanities series is an original and inspiring venture recognising that today’s world agricultural and water crises, ocean pollution and resource depletion, global warming from greenhouse gases, urban sprawl, overpopulation, food insecurity and environmental justice are all crises of culture.

The reality of understanding and finding adaptive solutions to our present and future environmental challenges has shifted the epicenter of environmental studies away from an exclusively scientific and technological framework to one that depends on the human-focused disciplines and ideas of the humanities and allied social sciences.

We thus welcome book proposals from all humanities and social sciences disciplines for an inclusive and interdisciplinary series. We favour manuscripts aimed at an international readership and written in a lively and accessible style. The readership comprises scholars and students from the humanities and social sciences and thoughtful readers concerned about the human dimensions of environmental change.

Please contact the Editor, Rebecca Brennan (Rebecca.Brennan@tandf.co.uk) to submit proposals

Praise for A Cultural History of Climate Change (2016):

A Cultural History of Climate Change shows that the humanities are not simply a late-arriving appendage to Earth System science, to help in the work of translation. These essays offer distinctive insights into how and why humans reason and imagine their ‘weather-worlds’ (Ingold, 2010). We learn about the interpenetration of climate and culture and are prompted to think creatively about different ways in which the idea of climate change can be conceptualised and acted upon beyond merely ‘saving the planet’.

Professor Mike Hulme, King's College London, in Green Letters

Series Editors:

Professor Libby Robin, Fenner School of Environment and Society, Australian National University, Canberra; Guest Professor of Environmental History, Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm Sweden.

Dr Paul Warde, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge, UK.

Editorial Board

Christina Alt, St Andrews University, UK, Alison Bashford, University of New South Wales, Australia, Peter Coates, University of Bristol, UK, Thom van Dooren, University of New South Wales, Australia, Georgina Endfield, Liverpool UK, Jodi Frawley, University of Western Australia, Andrea Gaynor, The University of Western Australia, Australia, Christina Gerhardt, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, USA,□    Tom Lynch, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA, Iain McCalman, University of Sydney, Australia,    Jennifer Newell, Australian Museum, Sydney, Australia, Simon Pooley, Imperial College London, UK, Sandra Swart, Stellenbosch University, South Africa, Ann Waltner, University of Minnesota, US, Jessica Weir, University of Western Sydney, Australia

International Advisory Board

William Beinart,University of Oxford, UK, Jane Carruthers, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa, Dipesh Chakrabarty, University of Chicago, USA, Paul Holm, Trinity College, Dublin, Republic of Ireland, Shen Hou, Renmin University of China, Beijing, Rob Nixon, Princeton University, USA, Pauline Phemister, Institute of Advanced Studies in the Humanities, University of Edinburgh, UK, Deborah Bird Rose, University of New South Wales, Australia, Sverker Sörlin, KTH Environmental Humanities Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, Helmuth Trischler, Deutsches Museum, Munich and Co-Director, Rachel Carson Centre, LMU Munich University, Germany, Mary Evelyn Tucker, Yale University, USA, Kirsten Wehner, University of London, UK

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
BUS072000
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Development / Sustainable Development
POL044000
POLITICAL SCIENCE / Public Policy / Environmental Policy