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1st Edition

Translational Criminology in Policing





ISBN 9780367713126
Published May 19, 2022 by Routledge
254 Pages 3 B/W Illustrations

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Book Description

With contributions from international policing experts, this book is the first of its kind to bring together a broad range of scholarship on translational criminology and policing. Translational criminology aims to understand the obstacles and facilitators to implementing research by decisionmakers to improve effectiveness, fairness, and efficiency in the criminal justice system. Although the emergence of the translation of knowledge from research to policy and practice has gained momentum in policing in recent years, it is imperative to understand the specific mechanisms required to create collaborative structures to produce and disseminate information. This progressive and cutting-edge collection of articles addresses the growing interest in creating and advancing evidence-based policing through translational mechanisms. It describes a varied, dynamic, and iterative decision-making process in which researchers and practitioners work simultaneously to generate and implement evidence-based research. Not only does this book incorporate a process for translating criminological information, it offers varying perspectives on researcher-practitioner partnerships around the world. 

Translational Criminology in Policing provides practical principles to help research, practitioner, and policymaker audiences facilitate evidence translation and research-practitioner partnerships. It is essential reading for policing scholars and policymakers, and may serve as a reference and textbook for courses and further research in translational criminology in policing. 

Table of Contents

Foreword by David Weisburd

PART I: An Introduction to Translational Criminology in Policing

1. Translational Criminology in Policing

Jordan Kenyon, Sean Wire, Kevin Petersen, Kiseong Kuen, & Muneeba Azam

PART II: The Process for Translating Evidence

2. A Four-Phase Process for Translating Research into Police Practice

Roberto G. Santos & Rachel B. Santos

3. Creating a ‘What Works’ Translational Tool for Police: A Researcher-City Government Partnership

Cody W. Telep & Claudia Gross Shader

4. Translating Police Research into Policy: Some Implications of the National Academies Report on Proactive Policing for Policymakers and Researchers

James Willis & Heather Toronjo

5. Making Sense of Evidence: Using Research Training to Promote Organisational Change

Kath Wilkinson, Katharine. Boyd, Mark Pearson, Hannah Farrimond, Iain A. Lang, Dreolin Fleischer, Alexis Poole, Neil Ralph & Brian Rappert

PART III: Researcher Practitioner Partnership

6. Present but Not Prevalent: Identifying the Organizational Correlates of Researcher-Practitioner Partnership in U.S. Law Enforcement

Jeff Rojek, John A. Shjarback, John Andrew Hansen, & Geoffrey P. Alpert

7. On Creating Ethical, Productive, and Durable Research Partnerships with Police Officers and Their Departments: A Case Study of the National Justice Database

Erin M. Kerrison, Philip Atiba Goff, Chris Burbank, & Jordan M. Hyatt

8. Openness to Research and Partnerships in Policing

Julie Grieco

9. Partnerships and Pitfalls: Insights from an Incomplete Evaluation of Police Training

Anne Li Kringen & Eve Stephens

10. Pracademic Insights from Police Research on Open Drug Scenes in Sweden

Mia-Maria Magnusson

PART IV: International Perspectives on Translational Criminology in Policing

11. Proclivity to Rely on Professional Experience and Evidence-Based Policing

Tal Jonathan-Zamir, David Weisburd, Michal Dayan, Maia Zisso

12. Cincinnati to Glasgow: A Case Study of International Policy Transfer of a Violence Reduction Program

William Graham

13. Translational Criminology in the Antipodes: A Tale of Trials, Tribulations and (Sometimes) Triumph

Lorraine Mazerolle, Sarah Bennett, Peter Martin, Michael Newman, & Debbie Platz

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Editor(s)

Biography

Muneeba Azam is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University. 

Jordan Kenyon (née Nichols) is senior lead scientist at Booz Allen Hamilton. She received her Ph.D. in Criminology from George Mason University in 2021.

Kiseong Kuen is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University and a graduate research assistant for the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy.

Yi-Fang Lu is a doctoral student and a graduate research assistant in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University.  

Kevin Petersen is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University and a graduate research assistant for the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy.

Sean Wire is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University and a graduate research assistant for the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy.

Xiaoyun Wu is a senior research associate at the National Police Foundation. She received her Ph.D. in Criminology from George Mason University in 2019.

Taryn Zastrow is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at George Mason University and a graduate research assistant for the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy.

David Weisburd is Distinguished Professor at George Mason University and Executive Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy, and Walter E. Meyer Professor of Law and Criminal Justice at the Hebrew University Faculty of Law in Jerusalem. He has received many awards for his contributions to criminology and crime prevention including the Stockholm Prize in Criminology (2010), the Sutherland and Vollmer Awards from the American Society of Criminology, and the Israel Prize. Professor Weisburd is the faculty mentor for the Police Research Group.

Reviews

I think this book will make an important contribution in the areas of translational criminology and evidence-based policing given the expertise of the editors and the array of international policing experts who are contributing articles. I also think it stands to sell well in a time when police are facing pressure to reform, police agencies are requiring more training and education for officers to be eligible for promotions, academic departments are launching more applied Master’s programs, and there is a growth of online programs with courses on evidence-based policy for which this book would be well suited.
—Joshua Hinkle, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Georgia State UniversityT

The concept of “Translational Criminology” can have an enormous impact within the field of criminal justice, and the current national (and international) clamor for improving police practices creates the perfect storm for this book to be released. If we are going to make substantive improvements in evidence-based policing (and processing through the justice system), we must make sure that we are not only implementing practices that have been proven to bring about sustainable change but that they also are understood and accepted by those on the front lines. Everyone in the field would benefit from this publication. 
—Susan Broderick, Program Director, National District Attorneys Association