Violence in Medieval Europe: 1st Edition (Paperback) book cover

Violence in Medieval Europe

1st Edition

By Warren C. Brown

Routledge

344 pages

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Description

The European Middle Ages have long attracted popular interest as an era characterised by violence, whether a reflection of societal brutality and lawlessness or part of a romantic vision of chivalry. Violence in Medieval Europe engages with current scholarly debate about the degree to which medieval European society was in fact shaped by such forces.

Drawing on a wide variety of primary sources, Warren Brown examines the norms governing violence within medieval societies from the sixth to the fourteenth century, over an area covering the Romance and the Germanic-speaking regions of the continent as well as England. Scholars have often told the story of violence and power in the Middle Ages as one in which 'private' violence threatened and sometimes destroyed 'public' order. Yet academics are now asking to what degree violence that we might call private, in contrast to the violence wielded by a central authority, might have been an effective social tool. Here, Brown looks at how private individuals exercised violence in defence of their rights or in vengeance for wrongs within a set of clearly understood social rules, and how over the course of this period, kings began to claim the exclusive right to regulate the violence of their subjects as part of their duty to uphold God's order on earth.

Violence in Medieval Europe provides both an original take on the subject and an illuminating synthesis of recent and classic scholarship. It will be invaluable to students and scholars of history, medieval studies and related areas, for the light it casts not just on violence, but on the evolution of the medieval political order.

Table of Contents

1.Violence and the Medieval Historian Part One Competing Orders 2. Violence among the early Franks 3. Charlemagne, God, and the License to Kill Part Two Local and Royal Power in the Eleventh Century 4. Violence, the Aristocracy, and the Church at the Turn of the First Millennium 5. Violence and Ritual Part Three Twelfth-Century Transformations 6. Violence, the Princes, and the Towns 7. Violence and the Law in England Part Four A Monopoly on Violence? 8. A Saxon Mirror 9. Violence and War in France 10. Conclusion: Competing Norms and the Legacy of Medieval Violence

About the Author

Warren C. Brown is Associate Professor of History at the California Institute of Technology. His previous publications include Unjust Seizure: Conflict, Interest, and Authority in an Early Medieval Society.

About the Series

The Medieval World

The Medieval World series covers post Roman and medieval societies and major figures in Europe and the Mediterranean, including western, central and eastern Europe as well as North Africa, the Middle East, and Byzantium. Books in the series cover a broad spectrum of subjects. These range from general topics, such as rural and urban economies, religion and religious institutions, rulership, law, conflict and power, gender and sexuality, and material culture, to biographies and interpretations of major figures, from kings, emperors and popes to saints and theologians.

Books in the Medieval World Series are intended to be an introduction to the authors’ specialist subjects and a gateway into the state of the art and current debates in those subjects – the book they would like their students to read before they take advanced undergraduate or graduate level seminars, and that scholars and students in other fields, both inside and outside of medieval history, would resort to first to learn about current work on these subjects.

At the same time, books in the series should be original scholarly monographs that contribute to their authors’ specific fields of interest. They should not only present the state of the art and introduce readers to current debates; they should express the authors’ ideas and develop them into innovative arguments that will contribute to and influence those debates.

The books should range in length between 100,000-and 140,000 words (including notes and other reference material). They may also contain a small number of images, provided that those images are discussed in the text.

If you are interested in writing for the series please contact:

Warren Brown, [email protected] and Piotr Górecki, [email protected]

Series Editors, The Medieval World

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
HIS000000
HISTORY / General
HIS010000
HISTORY / Europe / General
HIS037010
HISTORY / Medieval