What Is at Stake in Building “Non-Western” International Relations Theory?: 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

What Is at Stake in Building “Non-Western” International Relations Theory?

1st Edition

By Yong-Soo Eun

Routledge

112 pages

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Description

International Relations (IR) as a discipline is often deemed to be “too Western” centric. It has been argued that much of mainstream IR theory is “simply an abstraction of Western history.” In this respect, many IR scholars have called for “broadening” the theoretical horizon of IR while problematising the Western parochialism of the discipline, and it is increasingly acknowledged that IR needs to embrace a wider range of histories, experiences, and theoretical perspectives, particularly those outside of the West. However, despite such a meaningful debate over broadening the theoretical and practical horizons of IR, several critical questions remain unclear and under-explored. For example, does IR need to embrace pluralism? If so, how much? To what extent, and in what sense, is IR parochial? Should IR promote dialogue across theoretical and spatial divides? If so, how? Yong-Soo Eun addresses these questions. He undertakes a literature review and an empirical analysis of the extent to which the field has actually become diverse and pluralistic. This investigation considers diversity beyond the current limited focus on the geographical origins of theory. Yong-Soo also draws attention to the mechanisms and processes of knowledge production and transmission in IR. More importantly, he addresses what is probably the most acute issue associated with the “non-Western” IR theory-building enterprise; namely, fragmentation and dialogue. In conclusion, Yong-Soo notes that the role of unsettling the present hierarchical structure of the discipline falls to reflexive individual agents. He argues that in order for their agential power to be more fully harnessed in the opening up of IR, critical “self”-reflection and “collective” empathy and collaboration among marginalised scholars are all essential.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements and Preface

Tables

Chapter 1. Opening up the Debate Over “Non-Western” International Relations (IR)

Chapter 2. The Extent of Diversity in IR: Multiple Dimensions

Chapter 3. Why is IR so Western/Positivist-Centric?

Chapter 4. Broadening IR through Dialogue: Bridging the Positivist–Post-Positivist Divide

Chapter 5. Broadening IR through Dialogue: Interweaving Western IR Theory with the Indigenous Experience of Asia

Chapter 6. Conclusion: Reflexive Solidarity

Bibliography

Index

About the Author

Yong-Soo Eun is Associate Professor of Political Science and International Studies at Hanyang University (HYU), Seoul. Before joining HYU, he taught at the University of Warwick in the UK. He has published articles in scholarly journals, including Review of International Studies, International Studies Perspectives, and PS: Political Science and Politics. Yong-Soo is broadly interested in IR theory and the international politics of the Asia-Pacific region.

About the Series

IR Theory and Practice in Asia

This series will publish philosophical, theoretical, methodological and empirical work by prominent scholars, as well as that of emerging scholars, concerned with IR theory and practice in the context of Asia. It will engage with a wide range of issues and questions ranging from meta-theoretical underpinnings of existing Western-oriented IR theories to ways of theorising Asian histories and cultures.

What are we looking for?

While we are open to any exciting ideas for edited, single or co-authored work, we are currently inviting book proposals which intend to address the following areas:

  • Global IR
  • Critical test and application of IR theory in Asian contexts
  • IR scholarship in Asia
  • Asian international politics
  • Critical pedagogy of international studies
  • Sociology of IR scholarship
  • Asian theory of international relations (Chinese IR; Japanese IR; Korean IR; and IR in ASEAN)
  • Multiple (or competing) discourses about non-Western IR theory
  • Asian histories of international relations
  • Theoretical pluralism and fragmentation in IR
  • Dialogues and engagement in a pluralist IR

More specifically, the questions the series is interested in include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • What are the implications of the rise of Asia, and especially China, for IR as a discipline?
  • Through what mechanisms has Western IR theory dominated the discipline?
  • Why has IR, as a discipline, developed the way it has?
  • What are the distinctive features and teaching practices in Asian IR communities?
  • To what extent is Western IR theory useful in comprehending Asian international politics?
  • Do developments in contemporary Asia require new theoretical and methodological innovations?
  • Is the development of an Asian theory of IR desirable? If so, how might it be achieved?
  • Will efforts to develop Asian IR theory or schools lead IR to becoming a fragmented field of study?

If you have an idea for a new book in IR Theory and Practice in Asia, please send a written proposal to the Series Editors:

Yong-Soo Eun, Editor-in-Chief, ysir@hanyang.ac.kr

Shaun Breslin, Editor, Shaun.Breslin@warwick.ac.uk

Kosuke Shimizu, Editor, shimizu@world.ryukoku.ac.jp

Ja Ian Chong, Editor, polcji@nus.edu.sg

 

Editorial Board Members:

Peter J. Katzenstein, Cornell University, USA

T.V. Paul, McGill University, Canada

Tim Dunne, University of Queensland, Australia

Colin Wight, University of Sydney, Australia

Shaun Breslin, University of Warwick, UK

Takashi Inoguchi, University of Niigata Prefecture, Japan

Timothy M. Shaw, University of Massachusetts Boston, USA

Ian Hall, Griffith University, Australia

Wookhee Shin, Seoul National University

Chris Hughes, University of Warwick, UK

Mark Beeson, University of Western Australia

Yongjin Zhang, Bristol University, UK

Cheng-Chwee Kuik, National University of Malaysia

Inanna Hamati-Ataya, University of Cambridge, UK

Ching Chang Chen, Ryukoku University, Japan

Emilian Kavalski, The University of Nottingham Ningbo China

Pinar Bilgin, Bilkent University, Turkey

Qin Yaqing, China Foreign Affairs University, China

Chanintira na Thalang, Thammasat University, Thailand

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
POL011000
POLITICAL SCIENCE / International Relations / General
SOC008000
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Ethnic Studies / General