Why It's Hard to be Good: 1st Edition (Paperback) book cover

Why It's Hard to be Good

1st Edition

By Al Gini

Routledge

252 pages

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Description

"Al Gini's latest book surveys the landscape of ethical speed bumps and crash sites with his customary charm, verve and insight. Why It's Hard To Be Good is a creative exposé of the many reasons smart people do bad things." Steve Priest, Founder, Ethical Leadership Group

"Don't just read this book. Use it. Use it to challenge yourself and others with honesty, compassion, and humor, just as Gini does." John W. Dienhart, The Frank Shrontz Chair for Professional Ethics, Seattle University and author of Business, Institutions, and Ethics

"Why It's Hard To Be Good sets a new standard for clear and funny thinking. A master writer and astute observer of human behavior and culture, Gini has written yet another terrific and enriching book. You won't be able to put it down." John Eckberg, author of The Success Effect and business/workplace reporter for The Cincinnati Enquirer

It isn't easy to be good. Al Gini - at home both in philosophy and the corporate boardroom - speaks here in an engagingly direct voice about why we have so much trouble doing the right thing in life - at home, with family or strangers, and at work. Businesses struggle with ethical issues every day, and so do ordinary people. But a multinational corporation and a single thinking human being are bound together by the same dilemma: how to choose the right thing to do and then do it?

Al Gini lays out ideas for 'stepping out of the shadow of the self' - an argument for stopping thinking of yourself as the center of the universe. It's hard to be good, he explains, until we realize that being good only has meaning in relation to other people. Ideas of justice, fairness, and ethical behavior are just abstract ideas until they are put into action with regard to people outside ourselves.

This warm and generous book is for anyone who wants to know how to use ethical thinking as way to live, work, and be with others.

Reviews

"Al Gini is a philosopher who makes sense to everyone. Why It’s Hard to Be Good is penetrating, thought-provoking and a pleasure to read." Scott Turow, author of Presumed Innocent and Ordinary Heroes

"Al Gini's latest book surveys the landscape of ethical speed bumps and crash sites with his customary charm, verve and insight. Why It's Hard To Be Good is a creative exposé of the many reasons smart people do bad things." Steve Priest, Founder, Ethical Leadership Group

"Don't just read this book. Use it. Use it to challenge yourself and others with honesty, compassion, and humor, just as Gini does." John W. Dienhart, The Frank Shrontz Chair for Professional Ethics, Seattle University and author of Business, Institutions, and Ethics

"Why It's Hard To Be Good sets a new standard for clear and funny thinking. A master writer and astute observer of human behavior and culture, Gini has written yet another terrific and enriching book. You won't be able to put it down." John Eckberg, author of The Success Effect and business/workplace reporter for The Cincinnati Enquirer

"This is the book for these troubled times. With uncommon wisdom, Gini explores the world of ethics, and what it means to do right by others--and he does it in a manner that is so plainspoken it makes for one compelling read." Alex Kotlowitz, author of There Are No Children Here: The Story of Two Boys Growing Up in The Other America

Table of Contents

Prologue. Ethics Means What? Narcissism: Me Myself and I. Character, Integrity and Conscience. It’s so Easy to be a Bystander. Change, Choice and Culture. The Media and Morality. Ethics and the Workplace. Leisure and Play. Leadership, Money, Power. Sex (Yes, Sex). Death (Ditto). Epilogue

About the Author

Al Gini is Professor of Philosophy at Loyola University of Chicago. Co-founder of Business Ethics Quarterly, he is a frequent commentator for NPR's Chicago affiliate WBEZ-FM and is a regular speaker on questions of corporate ethics. He is the author of The Importance of Being Lazy (0415938791) and My Job, My Self, (041592636X) both published by Routledge.

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
PHI000000
PHILOSOPHY / General
PHI005000
PHILOSOPHY / Ethics & Moral Philosophy