Winning Ways for Your Mathematical Plays, Volume 3  book cover
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2nd Edition

Winning Ways for Your Mathematical Plays, Volume 3




ISBN 9781568811437
Published September 10, 2003 by A K Peters/CRC Press
364 Pages

 
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Book Description

In the quarter of a century since three mathematicians and game theorists collaborated to create Winning Ways for Your Mathematical Plays, the book has become the definitive work on the subject of mathematical games. Now carefully revised and broken down into four volumes to accommodate new developments, the Second Edition retains the original's wealth of wit and wisdom. The authors' insightful strategies, blended with their witty and irreverent style, make reading a profitable pleasure. In Volume 3, the authors examine Games played in Clubs, giving case studies for coin and paper-and-pencil games, such as Dots-and-Boxes and Nimstring. From the Table of Contents: - Turn and Turn About - Chips and Strips - Dots-and-Boxes - Spots and Sprouts - The Emperor and His Money - The King and the Consumer - Fox and Geese; Hare and Hounds - Lines and Squares

Reviews

" Second editions often pose a problem: are they new enough, different enough, to be worth getting even if one already owns the original edition? … Winning Ways is still valuable, and it is just as much fun today as it was 21 years ago. -Fernando Q. Gouvêa, MAA Online, October 2003
The tone throughout is deceptively light (and relentlessly punning!), but almost every paragraph represents the distillation of an extensive exploration of the game under discussion... -Nick Lord, The Mathematical Gazette, March 2005
""The book is full of pictures and diagrams, which makes the reading of the book quite comfortable."" -EMS Newsletter, June 2005
""Winning Ways is an absolute must have for those who are interested in mathematical game theory. It is sure to please any fan of recreational mathematics or simply anyone who is interested in games and how to play them well."" -Jacob McMillen, Math Horizons, November 2005"