Deborah Fish Ragin Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Deborah Fish Ragin

Professor of Psychology
Montclair State University

Deborah Fish Ragin is a Professor of Psychology at Montclair State University. She earned her A.B. in Psychology and Hispanic Studies from Vassar College in 1978 and her M.A. and PhD in Psychology from Harvard University in 1985. She served as an Assistant Professor of Community Health Education at Hunter College, City University of New York, and as an Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City.

Biography

Deborah Fish Ragin is a Professor of Psychology at Montclair State University. She is a graduate of Vassar College where she earned an A.B. in Psychology and Hispanic Studies in 1978. She continued her studies of psychology at Harvard University where she earned her M.A. in 1984 and her PhD in 1985. She was appointed an Assistant Professor of Community Health Education at Hunter College, City University of New York, and also served as an Associate Research Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (now the Icahn School of Medicine) also in New York City.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Ragin’s research interests include health disparities, healthy communities, and health systems and policy. She is the author of a number of  articles on HIV/AIDS, domestic violence, access to healthcare, disparities in health care, healthy communities, and research ethics. She has presented her research at major national and international conferences.

    Her professional service includes a five-year appointment as an American Psychological Association’s (APA) Representative to the United Nations, President of the APA’s Society for the Study of Peace, Conflict, and Violence (Division 48, Peace Psychology), member and Co-Chair of the American Psychological Association’s Committee on Divisions and APA Relations (CODAPAR), member of the Health Research Council of the Society of Health Psychology, Division 38 of the American Psychological Association, and member of the Committee on Associate and Baccalaureate Education in Psychology (CABE) also of the American Psychological Association.

Personal Interests

    Active sports interests include swimming, hiking, biking.
    Passive activities include needlepoint, knitting and reading non-fiction books, primarily history.

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Health Psychology 2E: Ragin - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

AJOB Emperical Bioethics

A paradigm for understanding trust and mistrust in medical research: The Community VOICES study


Published: Feb 24, 2018 by AJOB Emperical Bioethics
Authors: Smirnoff, M., WIlets, I., Ragin, D.F., Adams, R., Holohan, J., Rhodes, R., et. al.
Subjects: Health Psychology, Research Methods

Lack of trust in medical research is one of the most significant obstacles to research participation. Multiple variables have been identified as factors associated with research participant trust/mistrust. A conceptual model that provides meaningful insight into the interplay of factors impacting trust may promote more ethical research practice and provide an enhanced, actionable understanding of participant mistrust.

Social Science and Medicine

Defining the "Community" in Community Consultation for Emergency Research


Published: Mar 01, 2008 by Social Science and Medicine
Authors: Deborah Fish Ragin, Edmund RIcci, Rosamond Rhodes, Jennifer Holohan, Margaret Smirnoff, Lynne D. Richardson
Subjects: Psychological Science, Sociology & Social Policy, Health and Social Care

This study explores the feasibility of conducting community consultation in the context of emergency medical research by examining: research participant's definitions of community, the factors that help shape their definitions of community and the people they would authorize to render participation decisions on their behalves. Findings from this study suggest that participants' definitions of community vary as a function of the purpose of the definition and the demographics of the respondents.

 American Journal of Bioethics

The Role of Community Consultation in the Ethical Conduct of Research Without Consent.


Published: May 01, 2006 by American Journal of Bioethics
Authors: Richardson, L.D., Rhodes, R. Ragin, D.F., Wilets, I.
Subjects: Health Psychology, Research Methods & Statistics

In 1996, the federal government finalized regulations that permit certain types of emergency research without obtaining prospective informed consent from participants or their surrogates. Holloway focuses on a problematic aspect of these regulations: the requirements for community consultation and public disclosure. Her appraisal of community consultation appears to be a vehicle for an indictment of the notion of “community” currently used by institutionalized medicine and medical research.

Academic Emergency Medicine

Reasons for Using the Emergency Department: Results of the EMPATH Study


Published: Dec 16, 2005 by Academic Emergency Medicine
Authors: Deborah Fish Ragin, Ula Hwang, Rita Cydulka, David Holson, Keon Haley Jr., Christopher Richards, Bruce Becker, Lynne, D.
Subjects: Psychological Science, Health and Social Care

Emergency Medicine Patients' Access To Healthcare, a cross-sectional, observational study identified principal reasons why patients seek care in hospital emergency departments in the US. Twenty-eight hospitals participated. Demographic, clinical, and insurance data were collected for 24-hours at each site. Five factors characterized patients' reasons for seeking ED care. Medical necessity was the most frequent, followed by ED preference, convenience, affordability, and limitations of insurance.

Journal of Health and Social Policy

Shocking a Community into Action: A Social Marketing Approach to Cardiac Arrests


Published: Apr 01, 2005 by Journal of Health and Social Policy
Authors: Deborah Fish Ragin, Jennifer Holohan, Edmund RIcci, Chelsea Grant, Lynne D. Richardson
Subjects: Psychological Science, Health and Social Care

Social marketing techniques have enhanced programs designed to improve individuals or community health outcomes when adopting new health behaviors. The analysis of the Public Access Defibrillation Trial test this proposition. Data from one participating Trial site were analyzed and interpreted from a social marketing and behavior change model perspective, to assess the success in changing a community's response to cardiac arrest victims in 61 residential buildings in New York City.

Academic Emergency Medicine

Research without consent: Community perspectives from the Community VOICES study.


Published: Jan 01, 2005 by Academic Emergency Medicine
Authors: Richardson, L.D., Wilets, I., Ragin, D.F., Holohan, J., Ricci, E., Winkel, G., Rhodes, R.
Subjects: Health Psychology, Research Methods & Statistics

We report the findings of focus groups conducted with NYC PAD Trial community members regarding the conduct of research without obtaining consent, the specific provisions of the regulations that allow only life-threatening conditions to be studied, and only studies with the potential for direct benefit to participants to be conducted, the appropriate and relevant definition of community, and effective methods of communication for purposes of consultation and disclosure. regarding such studies.

Journal of Interpersonal Violence

Intergenerational substance abuse and domestic violence as familial risk factors for lifetime attempted suicide among battered women.


Published: Oct 01, 2002 by Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Authors: Ragin, D.F., Griffing, A. S., Sage, R.E., Madry, L. & Primm, B.J.
Subjects: Family Studies, Health Psychology, Gender & Intersectionality Studies

We examine the impact of inter-generational substance abuse and exposure to domestic violence on lifetime attempted suicide histories of adult, minority, battered women in a domestic violence shelter. Results: battered women with a history of suicide attempts were more likely to report substance abuse among both first- and second-degree relatives and witnessing physical abuse of their mothers than were women without such histories. Impacts of the extended family are also discussed.

Journal of Interpersonal Violence

Intergenerational Substance Abuse and Domestic Violence as Familial Risk Factors


Published: Oct 01, 2002 by Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Authors: Deborah Fish Ragin, Maura Pilotti, Lorraine Madry, Robert Sage,
Subjects: Psychological Science, Health and Social Care

This study examines the impact of two factors, intergenerational substance abuse and exposure to domestic violence, on the lifetime attempted suicide histories of adult, minority, battered women residing in a domestic violence shelter. Results revealed that battered women with a history of suicide attempts were more likely to report substance abuse among both first-degree (specifically fathers) and second-degree relatives than were women without such suicide attempt histories.

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