Bayram  Sinkaya Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Bayram Sinkaya

Assist Prof.
Ankara Yıldırım Beyazıt University

Dr. Sinkaya works as an Assistant Professor of International Relations at AnkaraYıldırım Beyazıt University, and advisor at ORSAM (Center for Middle Eastern Strategic Studies, Ankara). He received his Ph.D. at the Middle East Technical University (METU), where he worked as a research assistant (2002-2011). His academic interests include Iranian politics, foreign and security policies of Iran, Middle East politics and Turkish foreign policy.

Biography

Dr. Bayram Sinkaya works as an Assistant Professor of International Relations at AnkaraYıldırım Beyazıt University, and advisor at ORSAM (Center for Middle Eastern Strategic Studies, Ankara). He received his Ph.D. at the Middle East Technical University (METU), where he worked as a research assistant (2002-2011). He was a visiting researcher at Columbia University (2007-2008) and Tehran University (2003). His academic interests include Iranian politics, foreign and security policies of Iran, Middle East politics and Turkish foreign policy. He is the author of The Revolutionary Guards in Iranian Politics: Elites and Shifting Relations (NY: Routledge, 2016).

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Iranian Studies, Middle East Studies, International Relations

Personal Interests

    Iranian politics, foreign policy and security, Turkish politics

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Revolutionary Guards Iranian Politics Sinkaya - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Ortadoğu Etütleri

IRAN AND TURKEY RELATIONS AFTER THE NUCLEAR DEAL: COMPARTMENTALIZATION


Published: Dec 11, 2016 by Ortadoğu Etütleri
Authors: Bayram Sinkaya

Contrary to the expectations of many observers, urkey adopted a ‘cautious’ stand with regard to the nuclear deal between Iran and the P5+1, fi-nalized in July 2015, which aimed at a political solution to the long-lasting controversy over Iran’s nuclear program. Relations between urkey and Iran worsened considerably soon after the nuclear deal, arguably for geopolitical reasons.