Mark  Leccese Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Mark Leccese

Associate Professor, Journalism Department
Emerson College

Mark Leccese, as associate professor in the Journalism Department at Emerson College in Boston, worked for 30 years at newspapers and magazines before becoming a professor. He has written media criticism blogs for the website of The Boston Globe and WBUR-FM and published three articles on political blogs in academic journals. The companion blog to his book, The Elements of Blogging: Expanding the Conservation of Journalism, is at www.TheElementsOfBlogging.com.

Biography

Mark Leccese, as associate professor in the Journalism Department at Emerson College, has been a jazz trumpet player for many years, playing in amateur jazz combos around Boston. His horns are include a Jupiter XO 1600i Roger Ingram professional model, a vintage Conn Connstellation, and a Cuesnon flugelhorn. He also plays bass – a sweet cobalt blue Fender Precision. Before his knees went out, Mark spent summer nights as a catcher in the Boston Men’s Senior Amateur Baseball League. He never could hit the curveball with any authority.

Mark spent 30 years covering politics and government as a wire service reporter, a daily newspaper reporter, the editor-in-chief of the largest-circulation weekly newspaper in New England, the State House bureau chief for a large chain of Massachusetts newspapers, the founding editor of Beacon Hill: The Weekly Newspaper of Massachusetts Politics and Government, and a correspondent for The Boston Globe.

He has also been a magazine writer and editor, a literary critic, and Associate Editor of The Boston Business Journal. His freelance reporting and writing has appeared in publications including The Columbia Journalism Review, The Quill, The Boston Phoenix, Commonwealth, America, and Boston Magazine.

Before coming to Emerson College, Mark taught journalism and writing as an adjunct faculty member at Boston University and Northeastern University, and he was a Teaching Fellow in the English Department at Boston College, where he received his M.A in English.

From 2010-2014 he wrote a media criticism blog, called “Gatekeeper,” for Boston.com, the website of The Boston Globe, and then wrote a media criticism blog for “Cognoscenti: Thinking That Matters” at wbur.org, the website of Boston’s National Public Radio affiliate, WBUR-FM.

Mark’s scholarship on political blogs has been published in the academic journals Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly and Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies.

His book, The Elements of Blogging: Expanding the Conservation of Journalism, with co-author Jerry Lanson, was published in July 2015.

At Emerson, the courses Mark teaches include Public Affairs Reporting, Blogging, Interactive News, Beat Reporting, Feature Writing, the introductory lecture Discovering Journalism, and the graduate seminar Reporting and Writing.

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - The Elements of Blogging - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly September 21, 2009 vol. 86 no. 3 578-593

Online Information Sources of Political Blogs


Published: Oct 11, 2015 by Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly September 21, 2009 vol. 86 no. 3 578-593
Authors: Leccese, Mark

Bloggers claim to be crucial providers of information in American elections and policy debates, usurping the role of mainstream media. This study coded more than 2,000 hypertext links to different sources on six widely read political blogs during seven consecutive days. Less than 15% of hyperlinks were to primary sources. Almost half were to mainstream media reports. Thus, political blogs may be comparable to a newspaper comprised of only op-ed pages and opinion columnists.

Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies Volume: 4 – Issue: 2 – April - 2014

Shallow Netroots: Hypertext Links to Advocacy Organizations in Political Blogs


Published: Oct 11, 2015 by Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies Volume: 4 – Issue: 2 – April - 2014
Authors: Leccese, Mark

This study gathered data to determine how frequently the top three progressive and the top three conservative blogs use hypertext links to direct their readers to the Web sites of political advocacy organizations. The study coded 2,087 hypertext links on these six influential political blogs for seven consecutive days in January 2008, during the presidential primaries, to determine what percentage of hypertext links took readers to advocacy organizations.

Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies Volume: 5 – Issue: 3 July - 2015

Angry Words: A Content Analysis of Emotion in Political Blogs and Op-Ed Columns


Published: Oct 11, 2015 by Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies Volume: 5 – Issue: 3 July - 2015
Authors: Leccese, Mark and Regan, MM

The finding of this study that independent political blogs do not use more divisive diction than traditional newspaper op-ed writers raises the question of whether newspaper op-ed writers today are also part of the echo chamber of partisanship.

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