Deborah  Simonton Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Deborah Simonton

Professor

Deborah Simonton is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and she leads the Gender in the European Town Network. Her international reputation has led to invitations to act as an international reviewer for research grants, as a keynote speaker and to join panels on a range of topics. She studies the gendered and power relations articulated in 18th-century corporate towns in the context of commercial and polite culture. She co-edits Routledge Sudies in Eighteenth-century Cultures and Societies

Biography

Deborah Simonton is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and she leads the Gender in the European Town Network. Her international reputation has led to invitations to act as an international expert reviewer for research grants, to act as a keynote speaker and to join panels on a range of topics. She is mainly interested in eighteenth-century issues of women and gender. Her central focus is on education and the economy, which led her to study apprenticeship and which has ultimately led to the work she currently doing on gender in the European town. She studies the gendered and power relations articulated in the shifting economic structures of corporate towns in the context of commercial and polite culture. She is interested in the language of skill, which drew heavily on the masculine traditions of urban guilds and apprenticeship, and she has explored how the urban community was masculinised, how women utilised a range of strategies to either conform or circumvent urban regulation; and how commercial trading shaped the ways that men and women established themselves in urban culture. She interested in understanding how women (and girls) negotiate their places and identities in the largely patriarchal society of the eighteenth century, what ‘materials’ and devices they used and how they circumvented restrictions, such as guild and corporation records. She has recently moved toward thinking about the physical and metaphorical spaces they occupied and how they positioned themselves within them. She believes the network on Gender in the European Town, and the discussions and shared research of colleagues from across Europe has been one of the most interesting and stimulating experiences of her ‘historical’ life.

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Routledge Studies in Eighteenth-Century Cultures and Societies

By: Deborah Simonton
Subjects: History

https://www.routledge.com/Routledge-Studies-in-Eighteenth-Century-Cultures-and-Societies/book-series/RSECCS

Routledge Studies in Eighteenth-Century Cultures and Societies

Series Editors:

This series provides a forum for recent and established historians to present new research and explore fresh approaches to culture and society in the long eighteenth century. As a crucial period of transition, the period saw developments that shaped perceptions of the place of the individual and the collective in the construction of the modern world. Routledge Studies in Eighteenth-Century Cultures and Societies is a series that is globally ambitious in scope and broad in its desire to publish cutting-edge research that takes an innovative, multi-vocal and increasingly holistic approach to the period. The series will be particularly sensitive to questions of gender and class, but aims to embrace and explore a variety of fresh approaches and methodologies.

The editors seek proposals for book-length studies from individual or multiple authors that focus on the period c. 1680–1850 and are concerned with British, European and Global transnational histories. We welcome proposals for regional, national and comparative inter- or transnational studies that consider, but are not limited to, any of the following themes: gender, power, agency, race, religion and identity; constructions of femininities and masculinities; class; cultural histories of work, crime, diplomacy and politics; consumption and material culture; imperial and cross-cultural exchange.

Series Editors:

Elaine Chalus: [email protected]

Deborah Simonton: [email protected]