Jeffrey  Braithwaite Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Jeffrey Braithwaite

Professor
Macquarie University

Jeffrey Braithwaite is Founding Director, Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Director, Centre for Healthcare Resilience and Implementation Science and Professor of Health Systems Research, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Australia. His research centres on improving delivery systems, particularly examining patient safety, change, resilience, implementation science and complexity science.

Subjects: Healthcare

Biography

Professor Jeffrey Braithwaite is Foundation Director, Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Director, Centre for Healthcare Resilience and Implementation Science, and Professor of Health Systems Research, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University. Sydney, Australia. He has appointments at six other Universities internationally and he is a board member of the International Society for Quality in Health Care (ISQua) and consultant to the World Health Organisation.

His research examines the changing nature of health systems, attracting funding of more than AUD$91 million (USD$70 million). He is particularly interested in health care as a complex adaptive system, and applying complexity science to health care problems.

Professor Braithwaite has contributed over 600 total publications presented at international and national conferences on more than 800 occasions, including 75 keynote addresses. His research appears in journals such as British Medical Journal, The Lancet, Social Science & Medicine, BMJ Quality and Safety, and International Journal of Quality in Health Care. He has received 32 different national and international awards for his teaching and research. Further details are available at his Wikipedia entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeffrey_Braithwaite.

Outside of his research, he is very interested in the Anthropocene and the impact of human activity on human and species’ health, population and climate.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Contract bridge, organisational theory, international health sector reform, complexity theory, resilience in healthcare

Personal Interests

    contemporary human behaviour, human evolution, long distance running, long distance cycling

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Resilient Health Care, Volume 3 - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Medical Journal of Australia

CareTrack: assessing the appropriateness of health care delivery in Australia


Published: Sep 13, 2016 by Medical Journal of Australia
Authors: Runciman, Hunt, Hannaford, Hibbert, Westbrook, Coiera, Day, Hindmarsh, McGlynn, Braithwaite

Results: The adult Australians in this sample received appropriate care at 57% (95% CI, 54%–60%) of 35 573 eligible health care encounters. Compliance with indicators of appropriate care at condition level ranged from 13% (95% CI, 1%–43%) for alcohol dependence to 90% (95% CI, 85%–93%) for coronary artery disease. For health care ...

BMJ Open, 6: e012467. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012467

The basis of clinical tribalism, hierarchy and stereotyping


Published: Sep 13, 2016 by BMJ Open, 6: e012467. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012467
Authors: Braithwaite, Clay-Williams, Vecellio, Marks, Hooper, Westbrook, Westbrook, Blakely, and Ludlow

The basis of clinical tribalism, hierarchy and stereotyping: a laboratory-controlled teamwork experiment.

International Journal for Quality in Health Care

Improvement in quality of hospital care during accreditation


Published: Sep 13, 2016 by International Journal for Quality in Health Care
Authors: Hollnagel, E., Johnsen, S.P., Braithwaite, J., Falstie-Jensen, A.M. and Holst, R.
Subjects: Healthcare

Improvement in quality of hospital care during accreditation: A nationwide stepped-wedge study.

BMJ Open

The older, vulnerable patient review


Published: Sep 13, 2016 by BMJ Open
Authors: Taylor, N., Hogden, E., Clay-Williams, R., Li, Z., Lawton, R. and Braithwaite, J.
Subjects: Healthcare

The older, vulnerable patient review: a pilot and feasibility study of the Patient Measure of Safety (PMOS) with patients in Australia

International Journal for Quality in Health Care

Health sector accreditation research: a systematic review


Published: Sep 13, 2016 by International Journal for Quality in Health Care
Authors: Greenfield, D. and Braithwaite, J.
Subjects: Healthcare

Data sources A multi-method, systematic review of the accreditation literature was conducted from March to May 2007. The search identified articles researching accreditation. Discussion or commentary pieces were excluded. ... Study selection From the initial identification of over 3000 abstracts, 66 studies that met the search criteria by empirically examining accreditation were selected. ... The results, examining the impact or effectiveness of accreditation, were ...

Social Science & Medicine

How and where clinicians exercise power


Published: Sep 13, 2016 by Social Science & Medicine
Authors: Peter Nugus, David Greenfield, Joanne Travaglia, Johanna Westbrook, Jeffrey Braithwaite

How and where clinicians exercise power: Interprofessional relations in health care

Organization Studies 25 (1), 15-33

‘It’s an interesting conversation I’m hearing’: the doctor as manager


Published: Sep 13, 2016 by Organization Studies 25 (1), 15-33
Authors: R Iedema, P Degeling, J Braithwaite, L White
Subjects: Healthcare

The aim of this article is to outline in discursive-linguistic terms how doctor-managers (or 'physician-executives' as they are termed in the USA) manage the incommensurate dimensions of their boundary position between profession and organization. In order to achieve this we undertook a discourse analytical study of both recorded, situated talk and open interview data focusing on one doctor-manager navigating between profession and organization. The doctor-manager at the centre of this study ...

Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association

Multimethod evaluation of information and communication technologies ...


Published: Sep 13, 2016 by Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association
Authors: Westbrook, J.I., Braithwaite, J., Georgiou, A., Ampt, A., Creswick, N., Coiera, E. and Iedema, R.
Subjects: Healthcare

Multimethod evaluation of information and communication technologies in health in the context of wicked problems and sociotechnical theory

International Journal for Quality in Health Care

Levers for change


Published: Jul 15, 2016 by International Journal for Quality in Health Care
Authors: Hinchcliff, R., Greenfield, D., Hogden, A., Sarrami, P., Travaglia, J. and Braithwaite, J.
Subjects: Healthcare

Levers for change: an investigation of how accreditation programs can promote consumer engagement in healthcare

News

Clinical Tribalism: How it works and what are its effects?

By: Jeffrey Braithwaite
Subjects: Healthcare

In this short interview with Jeremy Fernandez of ABC News 24, Professor Jeffrey Braithwaite on behalf of the research team, discusses how clinical tribalism and pecking order behaviours were studied in the laboratory.  Too much tribalism impairs team work. One solution is to get rid of all those white coats, nurse's uniforms and badges of insignia. And emphasise that health care professionals are part of an extended team.

Finding scapegoats won't make healthcare safer

By: Jeffrey Braithwaite
Subjects: Healthcare

Some would be dissatisfied with the state government's explanation that it was a "systems failure" that tragically killed one newborn baby and seriously injured another when the wrong gas was connected to an outlet in the operating theatre of a Bankstown hospital.

But, NSW Secretary of Health Elizabeth Koff was right when she said "we failed as a system". It is systems, not individuals, that are responsible for devastating errors in complex organisations like hospitals. And it is also here that potential solutions lie.

[Read the full article by clicking on the URL]

Videos

Modernising patient safety: reconciling work-as-imagined and work-as-done

Published: Jul 07, 2016

In complex adaptive health systems, we need to figure out ways to reconcile Work-as-Imagined (WAI) and Work-as-Done (WAD). This would be a system where WAI policies, regulations and standards are much closer to an understanding of how work is actually done, and one in which WAD practitioners have a better appreciation of what WAI proponents are trying to do in establishing regulatory regimes.