Michael  John-Hopkins Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Michael John-Hopkins

Senior Lecturer in Law

Senior Lecturer in Law specializing in humanitarian law, human rights law, refugee law, land law and torts.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Humanitarian Law
    Human Rights Law
    International Criminal Law
    Refugee Law
    Land Law
    Housing Law

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - The Rule of Law in Crisis and Conflict Grey Zones - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies

The Creation and Protection of History through the Prism of International Criminal Justice


Published: Mar 06, 2019 by Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies
Authors: Dr Michael John-Hopkins Dr Shea Esterling
Subjects: Political Science, History, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Sociology & Social Policy, Military & Security Studies, Philosophy, Anthropology - Soc Sci, Archaeology, Law, Research Methods, Art & Visual Culture

This article examines the role that international criminal justice plays, firstly in creating history, and secondly in protecting history. It outlines the 'historiography' of international criminal justice before examining the contributions that it has made to the framework for the protection of cultural property.

Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies

Mapping War, Peace and Terrorism in the Global Information Environment


Published: Sep 05, 2018 by Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies
Authors: Dr Michael John-Hopkins
Subjects: Web, Mass Communications, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Sociology & Social Policy, Information Science, Middle East Studies, Military & Security Studies, Social Psychology, Law, Communications Studies, Media Communication

This article outlines in general terms how the environment of 21st century transnational organised crime, terrorism and unconventional conflict is being shaped by information-related capabilities that foster global networked connectivity and asymmetric responses to conventional military supremacy.

Journal of Conflict and Security Law

Extrapolation of Criminal Law Modes of Liability to Target Analysis under International Humanitarian Law: Developing the Framework for Understanding Direct Participation in Hostilities and Membership in Organized Armed Groups in Non-International Armed Conflict


Published: Jun 21, 2017 by Journal of Conflict and Security Law
Authors: Dr Michael John-Hopkins

The purpose of this article is to extrapolate criminal law models of accessorial liability and co-perpetration in order to elucidate the concepts of direct participation in hostilities and membership in an organized armed group.

International Review of the Red Cross

Regulating the conduct of urban warfare


Published: Jun 30, 2010 by International Review of the Red Cross
Authors: Michael John-Hopkins

Given the asymmetry of military capabilities in such conflicts, it is submitted that higher standards of reasonableness be imposed upon military commanders of major military powers to ensure constant care for civilian populations, and furthermore that civilian populations be spared more effectively from the effects of urban warfare by applying customary law ab initio,

International Journal of Refugee Law

The Emperor's New Safe Country Concepts: A UK Perspective on Sacrificing Fairnes


Published: Apr 20, 2009 by International Journal of Refugee Law
Authors: Michael John-Hopkins

This article focuses on the harmonized criteria relating to these safe third country and safe country of origin concepts and their inclusion within the UK asylum system, before exploring whether, and if so, to what extent, the application of such criteria reduces the level of procedural and concomitant substantive protection available to asylum seekers.

News

New article on the use of information related capabilities for the command and control of military operations.

By: Michael John-Hopkins
Subjects: Anthropology - Soc Sci, Communications Studies, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Information Science, Law, Mass Communications, Media Communication, Media and Cultural Studies, Media, Journalism and Communications, Middle East Studies, Military & Security Studies, Other, Psychology, Research Methods & Statistics, Social Psychology, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Web

This article outlines in general terms how the environment of 21st century transnational organised crime, terrorism and unconventional conflict is being shaped by information-related capabilities (IRCs) that foster global networked connectivity and asymmetric responses to conventional military supremacy. This article explores how the conceptual apparatus regarding the distinction between wartime and peacetime, as well as war zones and peace zones, which has been developed within the framework of international criminal law and humanitarian law, can contribute to military-strategic operational and capability concepts. Integration of these conceptual frameworks within strategic analysis can serve to promote the effective use of force within a full spectrum operational environment in which information, surveillance, target acquisition and reconnaissance thresholds are being lowered as deeper understandings of the social dynamic that sustains ongoing fighting within a global information environment become increasingly feasible through innovations in IRCs. In this context, this article suggests that law enforcement frameworks and approaches have a high threshold of applicability, i.e. to increasingly serious and organised situations of violence, if the strategic failures associated with conventional military operations are to be avoided. Rather than offering an analysis of cyber warfare/cyber attacks or information operations per se, this article is more generally concerned with understanding how military support and command and control operations are being conducted in the global information environment in order to achieve physical effects that can be characterised as non-international armed conflict.

Review of 'the Rule of Law in Crisis and Conflict Grey Zones' in Journal of Conflict and Security Law

By: Michael John-Hopkins

Michael John-Hopkins argues that there is the risk that the legal paradigm of hostilities is being over-applied to what are essentially situations of crisis rather than conflict. Accordingly, this study seeks to clarify at what point violence is so dangerous and intense that it exceeds the capacity of law enforcement methods and thus the regulatory standards set out in international human rights law.