Christine Salkin Davis Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Christine Salkin Davis

Professor
UNC-Charlotte

Christine S. Davis, Ph.D. is a Professor in the Communication Studies Department at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her research interests are in the intersection of family, health, and disability. Dr. Davis publishes regularly on topics such as children’s health, end-of-life communication, family disability, qualitative methods, and narrative ethnography and autoethnography.

Biography

Christine S. Davis, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Communication Studies Department at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Her research interests are in the intersection of family, culture, and health communication. Dr. Davis publishes regularly on topics such as children’s health, end-of-life communication, disability, and qualitative research methods. She has published over 50 academic books, journal articles, book chapters, and other publications and has received numerous research awards. She specifically studies people with illnesses and conditions that are incurable as they face revisions in their personal identity and narrative and negotiate the liminal spaces between ‘well’ and ‘unwell,’ alive and dead, and power and marginalization. She regularly teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in End-of-Life Communication, Healthcare Narratives, and Research Methods. She is author of Death: The Beginning of a Relationship (2010); Conversations about Qualitative Communication Research: Behind the Scenes with Leading Scholars (2014); Communicating Hope: An Ethnography of a Children’s Mental Health Care Team (2014); and Focus Groups: Applying Communication Theory through Design, Facilitation, and Analysis; and is lead author of Straight Talk about Communication Research Methods (3rd edition, 2017).  She is associate editor of the 2017 International Encyclopedia of Communication: Methods of Communication Research. She may be reached at UNC-Charlotte, Department of Communication Studies, Charlotte, North Carolina, 28223, (704) 687-0760, and at [email protected]

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Health Communication
    End of Life Communication
    Children's Health
    Family Disability
    Children's Mental Health
    Qualitative Research Methods

Personal Interests

    Hiking, Jogging, Swimming, Sailing, Traveling, Writing Poetry

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Focus Groups (Davis) - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Journal of Hate Studies

Absence, revision, and the Other: Rhetorics of South Carolina antebellum touris


Published: Jul 01, 2017 by Journal of Hate Studies
Authors: Breede, D. C.; Davis, C. S.; & Warren-Findlow, J.
Subjects: Media and Cultural Studies, Communication Studies, Communications Studies

In this critical rhetorical analysis of a series of tourism locales, we present and theorize rhetorics of absence and revision in multiple historical tourist sites. We discuss how the instances of thoughtful, varied, significant, and historically accurate inclusions of the experience of slavery on and within contrast sharply with the absences and inaccuracies that characterize some of the other tourism offerings.

Qualitative Inquiry

Baby let me follow you down: The love-death dialectic in story and song


Published: Sep 16, 2016 by Qualitative Inquiry
Authors: Crane, J. L. and Davis, C. S.
Subjects: Family Studies, Film and Video, Media and Cultural Studies, Mass Communications, Health and Social Care, Communication Studies, Communications Studies

In this article, we examine the love–death dialectic through a mosaic of story and song. Layering personal narrative and musical chronicles about love, life, and death—from the heroic to the tedious, the passionate to the mundane, the tragic to the contented, the transgressive to the faithful, and fantasy to reality—we consider the marriage of love and loss in narratives where multiple instantiations of the truth mix and mingle.

Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation

A Conceptual Model of Irritability Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Qualitati


Published: Mar 01, 2016 by Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
Authors: Hammond, F. M.., Davis, C. S., Cook, J., & Hirsch, M. A.
Subjects: Family Studies, Health and Social Care, Communication Studies

BACKGROUND: Individuals with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) may have chronic problems with irritability, which can negatively affect their lives. OBJECTIVES: (1) To describe the experience (thoughts and feelings) of irritability from the perspectives of multiple people living with or affected by the problem, and (2) to develop a conceptual model of irritability.

Death Studies

Constructing the dead: Retrospective sensemaking in eulogies


Published: Jan 14, 2016 by Death Studies
Authors: Christine S. Davis, Margaret M. Quinlan , & Debra K. Baker
Subjects: Media and Cultural Studies, Mass Communications, Health and Social Care, Communication Studies, Communications Studies

Eulogies serve a sensemaking function of identity construction—both for the deceased and for the survivors. This paper examines the communicative construction of identity in eulogies and shows how eulogia discourse affirms and reconstructs our relational identity through communication. The article extends scholarship on eulogies by using relational communication theories to investigate how eulogic discourse functions as identity construction.

Journal of Contemplative Inquiry

Holistic ethnography: Embodiment, emotion, contemplation, and dialogue in ethnog


Published: Jan 01, 2015 by Journal of Contemplative Inquiry
Authors: Davis, C. S., & Breede, D.C.
Subjects: Media and Cultural Studies, Health and Social Care, Anthropology - Soc Sci, Communication Studies

This paper theorizes holistic ethnography—an ethnographic method of inquiry that is similar to an embodied meditation practice—a conscious awareness of experience in which the researcher intentionally and variously focuses her attention on physical sensations, emotions, contemplation, and dialogue to contribute to deep sensemaking and critical examination, to better able to critically examine cultural and social phenomena.

Journal of Loss and Trauma

A dialogue with (un)death: Horror films as a discursive attempt to construct a r


Published: Jan 01, 2015 by Journal of Loss and Trauma
Authors: Davis, C. S., & Crane, J. L.
Subjects: Film and Video, Media and Cultural Studies, Health and Social Care, Communication Studies, Communications Studies

Death may be exiled from the living room, but death has reappeared with a vengeance in our books, kindled and original paper, and channeled through our home entertainment centers. We highlight how fictional works about the undead allow us to face death and relate to it, as they move us to look more closely at the alliance between living and dead, provide us with a tangible adversary at end-of-life, and enable us to approach death with dialogic intimacy, acknowledgment, courage, and acceptance.

Videos

Christine Salkin Davis discussing her book Communicating Hope

Published: Jul 10, 2017

Christine Salkin Davis discussing her book Communicating Hope

Christine Salkin Davis discussing her book Conversations about Qualitative Commu

Published: Jul 10, 2017

Christine Salkin Davis discussing her book Conversations about Qualitative Communication Research