Bruce Oliver Newsome Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Bruce Oliver Newsome

Lecturer
University of California Berkeley

Bruce Oliver Newsome, PhD, is a lecturer in international relations at the School of Global Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Before teaching, he was a research policy scientist at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California. He earned his undergraduate degree with honors in war studies from Kings College London, a master's degree in political science from the University of Pennsylvania, and a PhD in international studies from the University of Reading.

Biography

I specialize in the increasingly complex world of risk and security, from managing the risks of natural disasters, say, to counter-terrorism, to controlling the risks of war.

In every case, I cut across the political, economic, and legal issues (counter-terrorism is the easiest illustration). I am inter-disciplinary by training (from hard sciences to history to social science) and experience (formally in policy science, political science, management science, and interdisciplinary international/global studies).

I am a social scientist by training and choice, and I oppose the slide of the disciplinary social sciences away from science. I practice and teach evidence-based research, replicability, logical arguments, critical thinking, and testable theories.

I am an applied researcher by choice. I do not care for abstract theorizing or subjective opinions, only for applied evidence-based research that is useful in the field.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    counter-terrorism, emergency management, international conflict, international security, national security, risk management, security management, social scientific methods, research skills, analytical skills

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Countering New(est) Terrorism (Newsome et al) - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Journal of Strategic Studies

The Myth of Intrinsic Combat Motivation


Published: Dec 07, 2017 by Journal of Strategic Studies
Authors: Bruce Oliver Newsome
Subjects: Homeland Security

The existing literature ignores the distinction between combat motivation and the motivation to serve; and between intrinsic and extrinsic motivations. Motivations to serve, which are intrinsic, are not completely transitive with combat motivations, which are largely extrinsic.

International Journal of Risk Assessment and Management

The 6.5 Ts: Rationalising Security and Risk Management Strategies


Published: Dec 03, 2015 by International Journal of Risk Assessment and Management
Authors: Bruce Oliver Newsome
Subjects: Business & Management, Homeland Security, Emergency Response, Disaster Planning & Recovery

Known strategies for responding to risk or insecurity help us to establish our options, make choices, follow best practices, behave commonly or inter-operably with our partners, and communicate about our behaviours with a common understanding. This article reviews what is meant by a strategy, reviews and aligns currently prescribed strategies, and rationalizes the following strategies in detail: tolerate; treat (which sometimes leads to terminate); turn; take; transfer; and thin.

Defence Studies

Rewarding the Cowboy, Punishing the Sniper: The Training Efficacy of Computer-ba


Published: Dec 03, 2011 by Defence Studies
Authors: Bruce Oliver Newsome; Matthew W. Lewis
Subjects: Computer Game Development, Homeland Security, Gaming, Disaster Planning & Recovery , Animation

The military is heavily invested in digital training environments, but the efficacy of this training is rarely validated. This articles identifies the positive training outcomes but also plenty of negative training outcomes, and offers advice on how to achieve the best outcomes in realistic situations.

Journal of Security Sector Management

Building Counter-Terrorism Capacity Across Borders: Lessons from the Defeat of ‘


Published: Dec 07, 2008 by Journal of Security Sector Management
Authors: Bruce Oliver Newsome; Christos Floros
Subjects: Homeland Security

Counterterrorism is practically impossible in the absence of interorganizational coordination. Unfortunately, interorganizational coordination does not arise spontaneously. Managers should develop externally oriented cultures and cooperative institutional objectives, which, ideally, should be accountable to international institutions.

Studies in Conflict and Terrorism

Expatriate Games: Inter-organizational Coordination and International Counterter


Published: Dec 01, 2006 by Studies in Conflict and Terrorism
Authors: Bruce Oliver Newsome
Subjects: Homeland Security

Counterterrorism is practically impossible in the absence of interorganizational coordination. Unfortunately, interorganizational coordination does not arise spontaneously. Managers should develop externally oriented cultures and cooperative institutional objectives, which, ideally, should be accountable to international institutions.

Defence and Security Analysis

Don’t Get Your Mass Kicked: A Management Theory of Military Capability


Published: Dec 06, 2003 by Defence and Security Analysis
Authors: Bruce Oliver Newsome
Subjects: Business & Management, Homeland Security, Emergency Response

Surprisingly military capability is not rigorously defined or theorized, except to assume it as transitive with material power, thereby neglecting the role of management. The dominant pathology is centralization, which is materially efficient. This article prescribe resource-appropriate management, mixing centralized material and decentralized human resources.

Photos

News

Why the latest wave of terrorism will get worse before it gets better

By: Bruce Oliver Newsome
Subjects: Homeland Security

Yes, terrorism is getting worse. Nearly thirty years ago, analysts identified what they called "new terrorism," but I have identified in the last decade "the newest terrorism" - more religious, like the new terrorism, but even more lethal and frequent, and moving into new weapons and media. The newest terrorists aim to kill as many people as possible, as frequently as possible, as horrifically as possible, intimately, suicidally, with the most accessible weapons, in the most accessible public spaces. Our analysis shows the changes, and how to counter them.