I was born as Nilyufer Mustafova Ahmedova in Yonkovo, a small village in the Northeast part of Bulgaria, which was famously known as Ludogoriye ("Wild Forest"). When the official state policy of the Jivkov rule endorsed the so-called "revival process," more than a million Bulgarian citizens with Turkish origin had been converted into a new ethnic identity and received Bulgarian, Slavic, and Christian names. In February 1985, after the military aggression over the turbulent assimilation process had died out, Lilia Martinova Andreeva became my official name. The "revival process" had been originally planned and foreseen as irrevocable and irreversible. However, in June, 1989, the decline of "the Iron Curtain" ensued a massive and compulsory emigration to Turkey, and forced thousands of individuals of the Turkish minority who resisted the new order to leave their native lands. After a long and devastating journey by train, I and my family landed in Ankara, the capital city of Turkey, where we started a life from "zero" (like most immigrants in those days who witnessed the fall of the Berlin Wall). I finished high school and worked in different jobs to support myself and my family. My working life in the private sector had become a sequence of semi-traumatic experiences in a free market system, which I failed to acknowledge and understand. My educational life, in its own right, faced many ups and downs, too, meanwhile, and seeing the necessity to study at a university, I decided to change my direction in life and learn English to become a teacher. I had been working in a small translation firm and preparing for my future college life simultaneously. I used to speak Bulgarian, Turkish, Russian, a little German, but knew very little English. Finally, after I passed the official state exams, I was able to attend Hacettepe University in Ankara, where I received a First Class Honour's Degree in American Studies. I completed my Master's Degree at Gazi University, at the Department of English Language Teaching, where I also started my professional life as an English instructor. My Master's thesis had a pedagogical orientation; it was based on the teaching of the novel with a specific reference to Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man. After a failed attempt to start a PhD in U.K. (where I was offered a place), I completed my Doctoral Degree at Middle East Technical University in Ankara, with a thesis on Thomas Hardy's poetry, which later constituted the groundwork of my monograph-Hardy Deconstructing Hardy: A Derridean Reading of Thomas Hardy's Poetry, published by Routledge in 2017. My experience with Routledge has become the most groundbreaking and fulfilling moment in my life. It has prompted my ambition to continue my critical studies in literature. I am currently employed as an assistant professor at Kırklareli University, at the Department of Western Languages and Literatures, Division of English Language and Literature, Kırklareli, Turkey. I continue my studies and research on literary theory, criticism, and poetry. I personally enjoy publishing short articles and translations of poetry in popular Turkish journals. It is my greatest pleasure to see that readers of literature get acquainted with famous English and American poets, and experience the universality of feelings and emotions shared by all humanity. I feel that literature, poetry and philosophy redefine who I am, tell a narrative of who I used to be, and who I want to become. My future plans and projects involve more writing, not only for academic purposes, but a writing for pleasure, one that will become a crossroad of a variety of cultures, identities, narratives, and stories which I hope to share with the world.
Education
PhD, Middle East Technical University, 2015
Areas of Research / Professional Expertise
Literary Theory, Modernism, Postmodernism, Modernist poetry, Education, Translation of Poetry
Personal Interests
Philosophy, literary theory, literature, languages, translation, politics, history, theater, cinema
Websites