Stephen  Kershnar Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Stephen Kershnar

Distinguished Teaching Professor
State University of New York at Fredonia

Stephen Kershnar is a distinguished teaching professor in the philosophy department at the State University of New York at Fredonia and an attorney. He focuses on applied ethics and political philosophy. Kershnar has written over eighty articles and book chapters on such diverse topics. He is the author of nine books, including Shooting Abortion-Doctors: Does the Pro-Life Worldview Make Sense? (2017).

Subjects: Philosophy

Biography

Stephen Kershnar is a distinguished teaching professor in the philosophy department at the State University of New York at Fredonia and an attorney. He focuses on applied ethics and political philosophy. Kershnar has written over eighty articles and book chapters on such diverse topics as adult-child sex, affirmative action, capitalism, discrimination, equal opportunity, Hell, most valuable player, pornography, sexual fantasy, slavery, and torture. He is the author of nine books, including Abortion, Hell, and Shooting Abortion-Doctors: Does the Pro-Life Worldview Make Sense? (2017).

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Applied Ethics, Political Philosophy

Personal Interests

    Running, Literature, Politics

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Does the Pro-Life Worldview Make Sense? - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Business and Professional Ethics

Shareholder Theory in Academia


Published: Apr 09, 2018 by Business and Professional Ethics
Authors: Stephen Kershnar
Subjects: Philosophy

In this article, I argue that university officers' duties are to follow the promises they made to the shareholders.

Reason Papers

Avoiding Excessive Gratitude Toward Veterans and Why It Matters: A Response to Michael Robillard and Pauline Shanks Kaurin


Published: Dec 20, 2017 by Reason Papers
Authors: Stephen Kershnar

In this article, I discuss with Michael Robillard and Paul Shanks Kaurin whether Americans should be very grateful to veterans.

International Journal of Applied Philosophy

Does the Emolument Rule Exist for the President?


Published: Jul 12, 2017 by International Journal of Applied Philosophy
Authors: Stephen Kershnar
Subjects: Philosophy

I argue that the Constitution's Emoluments Clause does not bind the President.

Criminal Justice Ethics

Forfeiture Theory and Symmetrical Attackers


Published: Jul 06, 2017 by Criminal Justice Ethics
Authors: Stephen Kershnar
Subjects: Philosophy

In this paper, I defend the following thesis: The Problem of Symmetrical Attackers does not falsify forfeiture theory. theory is not falsified by this problem.

Philosophia

A New Argument for the Irrelevance of Equality for Intrinsic Value


Published: Oct 06, 2016 by Philosophia
Authors: Stephen Kershnar, Duncan Purves
Subjects: Philosophy

In this article, we argue that the way of calculating the good shows that equality is not an intrinsic good.

The Critique

Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Case for Reparations and Spiritual Awakening: The Failure of Liberal Imagination


Published: Jul 14, 2016 by The Critique
Authors: Stephen Kershnar

In this article, I discuss Ta-Nehisi Coates' argument on reparations.

Bioethics

Quantifying Health Across Populations


Published: Jul 01, 2016 by Bioethics
Authors: Stephen Kershnar

In this article, I discuss how to rank populations in terms of how healthy they are.

Videos

Debate on Abortion

Published: Nov 28, 2017

Professor John Keller and Distinguished Teaching Professor debate the morality of abortion at the State University of New York at Fredonia.

Debate on whether God exists

Published: May 10, 2016

Professors Dale Tuggy and Stephen Kershnar debate whether God exists.

Debate on Free Will - Part 1

Published: Oct 29, 2015

Professors John Keller and Stephen Kershnar debate whether people are morally resposible.

Debate on Free Will - Part 2

Published: Oct 29, 2016

In the second part of the debate, professors John Keller and Stephen Kershnar have a question and answer with regard to moral responsibility.