Clarke Ramon Jones Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Clarke Ramon Jones

Senior Research Fellow
Research School of Psychology

I am a criminologist at the Research School of Psychology at the Australian National University. I research youth radicalization interventions, prison radicalization and gangs. I currently advise Philippines corrections on jail and prison reform and regularly brief other international governments in these areas. Domestically, I also partner with Muslim community organisations to develop and implement culturally and religiously sensitive interventions for Muslim youth.

Biography

I am a criminologist based at the Research School of Psychology at the Australian National University (ANU). My research covers violent extremism, radicalization, community-led youth interventions, prison radicalization, correctional reform, and gangs. I have published extensively and have a book soon to be released by Routledge titled, Inmate Radicalization and Recruitment in Prisons. Before moving into academia in 2010, I worked for over 15 years in several areas of national security, including police, military and intelligence. I am currently advising Philippines corrections on the management of high-risk inmates, violent extremist offenders, and prison gangs. I also regularly brief other international governments in these areas. In 2015, I was the founding director of the Australian Intervention Support Hub (AISH) at the ANU, which was an initiative aimed at supporting government and community countering violent extremism (CVE) efforts through the provision of multidisciplinary research. Following on from AISH, I now partner with several Muslim community organisations in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia, including some of the most conservative and hard-to-reach Salafi groups, to develop and implement culturally and religiously sensitive, community-driven, and evidence-based responses to anti-social youth behaviors. To achieve better ecological validity, I have developed long-term trusted friendships by participating in youth camps, sporting activities, religious lectures, religious events/festivals, family occasions, and council (or Shurah) meetings.
For the past eight years, I have also worked as a private consultant, particularly around prison and sentencing reform and crime prevention. I have recently completed a review of Indigenous offender rehabilitation programs in Australia, a review on prison radicalization in Australia’s correctional system, and a report on the efficacy of CVE programs in schools for government and non-government agencies. In 2002, I was the 2002 Chief of the ADF Force Fellow and, based on this fellowship, completed my PhD at the University of New South Wales in 2010. I also hold a Masters (by research) in Criminology, and a degree in Criminal Justice Administration from RMIT University.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    violent extremism, radicalization, community-led youth interventions, prison radicalization, correctional reform, and gangs.

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Inmate Radicalisation and Recruitment in Prisons: Jones - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

The Australiasian Institute for Judicial Administration

Efficacy, accessibility and adequacy of prison rehabilitation programs for Indigenous offenders across Australia


Published: Jan 31, 2019 by The Australiasian Institute for Judicial Administration
Authors: Dr Clarke Jones & Dr Jill Guthrie

In Australia, as elsewhere in the world, prisoners are among the most stigmatised and often socially excluded citizens in the community, characterised by extreme socio-economic and psychological disadvantage. Indigenous offender numbers contributed significantly to those rates, accounting for 27% of the total prisoner population, which at 2,241 per 100,000 represents a rate of more than 16 times higher than that for non-Indigenous Australians.

Studies in Conflict and Terrorism

Integration versus Segregation: A Preliminary Examination of the Philippine Corrective System for De-Radicalization


Published: Jan 31, 2019 by Studies in Conflict and Terrorism
Authors: Dr Clarke Jones & Dr Resurrecion Morales

Operations to counterterrorism in the southern Philippines have resulted in the arrest and incarceration of a significant number of key militants. As a result, the Philippine government has expressed concern that these inmates may radicalize others and continue to operate while incarcerated. As a preventive measure, the government has considered a number of “soft” counterstrategies, including the development of a de-radicalization program.

The Prison Journal

Understanding Prison Management in the Philippines: A Case for Shared Governance


Published: Jan 01, 2017 by The Prison Journal
Authors: Dr Raymund Narag & Dr Clarke Jones

Current prison management models strictly prohibit inmates from assisting with prison administration or governance. This is feasible in developed countries where governments can provide adequate resources, security, and personnel. It is not, however, realistic in developing countries like the Philippines, which is characterized by poverty, corruption, and underresourcing of correctional facilities. In such circumstances, inmate leaders tend to share governance with prison administrators.

Punishment and Society

Are Prison Really Schools for Terrorism? Challenging the Rhetoric on Prison Radicalization


Published: Jan 07, 2014 by Punishment and Society
Authors: Dr Clarke Jones

When governments justify the necessity to segregate and/or isolate terrorist inmates from mainstream prisoners, they commonly raise concerns about their prisons becoming schools for terrorism. Yet, these concerns are often based on limited information about prisoner radicalization, potentially resulting in the mismanagement (both financially and psychologically) of terrorist inmates in many countries. This article challenges contemporary research on prison radicalization and recruitment .