Dr. Amanda Goodrich completed and was awarded her PhD in eighteenth century British history at Royal Holloway, University of London in 2002. She then taught as an Associate Lecturer at both Royal Holloway and the Open University until in 2009 she was employed as a lecturer at the Open University.  In addition to history, she has taught a wide range of multi-disciplinary material in OU modules including a long-standing popular module ‘From Enlightenment to Romanticism, c. 1785-1830.’ Such multi-disciplinary teaching fed her interest in incorporating a broad range of sources in historical research.  Amanda has written module materials at the OU on the French Revolution and early modern European social and cultural history, in particular, early modern popular protest and identities.
Education
University of Roehampton
University of London
Areas of Research / Professional Expertise
Amanda’s research expertise covers Georgian history including representations of aristocracy, extra-parliamentary politics and political ideas in Britain and France during the French Revolution and cultural history of race and identities in Europe and the Atlantic World. Her recent Routledge publication is her first research biography. It explores the life of a West Indian of African/British descent who lived much of his life in Georgian Britain and Europe.  This work brings politics and identity together.

Amanda’s publications include books:  Henry Redhead Yorke, Colonial Radical: Politics and identity in the Atlantic World, 1772-1813, (Routledge, 2019); Debating England’s Aristocracy in the 1790s: pamphlets, polemics and political Ideas, in the Royal Historical Society series Studies in History, (Woodbridge: Boydell & Brewer, 2005). Major articles include ‘Radical “Citizens of the World” 1790-1795: the Early Career of Henry Redhead Yorke’, Journal of British Studies, Vol 53 (3), July 2014, pp. 611-635; ‘Understanding a Language of Aristocracy, 1700-1850’, The Historical Journal, Vol 56 (2), 2013, pp. 369-398. Also, chapters in edited editions include; ‘Radical Popular Attitudes to the Monarchy in Britain during the French Revolution’, in Andreas Gestich and Michael Schaich (eds.) The Hanoverian Succession: Dynastic Politics, Monarchical Representation and Union between Britain and Hanover, (Ashgate, 2015), pp. 261-278. As historical advisor to the British Library exhibition Georgians Revealed, (2013-14) she wrote the ‘Introduction’ in M Goff (ed.) Georgians Revealed: Life, Style and the Making of Modern Britain (British Library, 2013) pp. 6-23.
Personal Interests
Walking, yoga, skiing, cooking, cinema, theatre, gardening, family and reading novels.