Richard's books and articles demonstrate the value of a broad interdisciplinary framework for examining the relationship between technology, design, and contemporary cultural theories. He's investigated the way people configure spaces through the use of digital social networks and mobile devices.
Richard has also examined the influence of the sharing economy in architecture, in particular the urban metaphors engendered by blockchain technologies and cryptocurrencies. The idea of the coded city has sparked his interest recently, informed not least by his investigation of the semiotic theories of the Pragmatic philosopher Charles Sanders Peirce. Richard's work draws on a wide range of sources across many disciplines, including practical experimental and design work. His research into urban living draws on social economics and studies into the society of the gift. While celebrating the opportunities provided by digital technologies, his research adopts a critical posture to both the technologies and the narratives scholars construct around them.
Education
PhD, MLArch, BArch(Hons)
Areas of Research / Professional Expertise
He is a registered architect (Australia), and previously worked at the Universities of Sydney and Melbourne. He is a member of the RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects), the RIAS (Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland), the HEA (Higher Education Academy), a Fellow of the RSA (Royal Society of Arts), and a Life Member of Clare Hall, Cambridge.
Richard has served as Head of the Department of Architecture at the University of Edinburgh, and Head of the School of Arts, Culture and Environment, that included architecture, music and history of art.
Personal Interests
I enjoy supervising PhD students, blogging, writing, vigorous exercise (still), travel and hiking in the countryside. It’s fair to say I like new gadgets and challenging ideas. I’m a technophile. I recently completed a book on mood and emotion that appeared with MIT Press in January 2016. I am also thinking a lot about nature and just published a book called Network Nature, with Bloomsbury Academic. So that makes me something of a biophile, or a critical technobiophile!
Websites