Clive John Petry Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Clive John Petry

Senior Research Associate
University of Cambridge

Clive Petry was born in London, England. He received a BSc degree in Biochemistry (Medical) from the University of Surrey, Guildford, U.K. in 1991 and then an MSc degree in Clinical Biochemistry in 1993 from the same institution. In 1998, he received a PhD degree in Clinical Biochemistry from the University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K. Since that time, he has worked at the University of Cambridge. In 2006, he was made a Senior Research Associate. He has authored over 50 scientific publications.

Biography

Clive J. Petry was born in London, England. He received a BSc degree in Biochemistry (Medical) from the University of Surrey, Guildford, U.K. in 1991 and then an MSc degree in Clinical Biochemistry in 1993 from the same institution. In 1998, he received a PhD degree in Clinical Biochemistry from the University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K. Since that time, he has worked at the University of Cambridge as a Postdoctoral Research Associate firstly in the Department of Clinical Biochemistry (1997–2000) and since 2001 in the Department of Paediatrics. In 2006, he was made a Senior Research Associate. He has authored over 50 scientific publications and currently serves on the Editorial Board of the British Journal of Nutrition, the Journal of Nutritional Science, Human Reproduction and I.S.R.N. Obstetrics and Gynecology. He is a member of the Association for Clinical Biochemistry, the Biochemical Society, the Nutrition Society, and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. His research involves trying to understand the mechanisms and consequences of the link between altered fetal growth and the short- and long-term risk of the development of diseases such as gestational and type 2 diabetes and hypertension.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    My research is involved in trying to understand the mechanisms and consequences of the link between altered fetal growth and the future development of diseases such as gestational and type 2 diabetes, gestational hypertension, the metabolic syndrome and precocious pubarche. Dr Petry’s strategy involves the phenotypic analysis of in vivo models and in vitro genetic association studies relating common polymorphic variation in DNA with markers of disease. He is currently leading a programme of work assessing the role of fetal imprinted genes on maternal metabolism and physiology in pregnancy.

Personal Interests

    Football (a supporter of Bristol Rovers football club)
    Folk Music (many artists plus trashing about on one of my ukuleles)
    Elder at New Life Church Cambridge

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Gestational Diabetes: Origins, Complications, & Treatment - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Journal of Hypertension

The potential impact of the fetal genotype on maternal blood pressure during pre


Published: Aug 01, 2014 by Journal of Hypertension
Authors: Clive Petry, Kathryn Beardsall, David Dunger
Subjects: Biomedical Science, Life Science, Medicine

The heritability of pregnancy-induced hypertension (encompassing both gestational hypertension and preeclampsia) is around 0.47, suggesting that there is a genetic component to its development. However, the maternal genetic risk variants discovered so far only account for a small proportion of the heritability. This article reviews the current state of knowledge linking the fetal genotype with maternal blood pressure in pregnancy.

Diabetes

Associations between paternally transmitted fetal IGF2 variants and maternal cir


Published: Sep 16, 2011 by Diabetes
Authors: Petry CJ, Seear RV, Wingate DL, Manico L, Acerini CL, Ong KK, Hughes IA, Dunger DB
Subjects: Biomedical Science, Medicine

To test the hypothesis that paternally transmitted fetal IGF2 is associated with maternal glucose concentrations in late pregnancy 17 IGF2 SNPs were genotyped in 1,160 family DNA trios. Paternally transmitted (but not maternally trasmitted) fetal IGF2 SNPs were associated with maternal glucose concentrations; specifically, paternally transmitted fetal rs6578987, rs680, rs10770125 (P = 0.0002), and rs7924316 alleles were associated with increased late pregnancy maternal glucose concentrations.

Human Genetics

Maternally transmitted foetal H19 variants and associations with birth weight.


Published: May 15, 2011 by Human Genetics
Authors: Petry CJ, Seear RV, Wingate DL, Acerini CL, Ong KK, Hughes IA, Dunger DB
Subjects: Biomedical Science, Medicine

This study was designed to test the hypothesis that polymorphic variation in maternally transmitted foetal H19 alleles is associated with offspring size at birth. The foetal rs2071094 allele inherited from the mother was associated with increased birth weight (p = 0.0015) adjusted for gestational age, parity and sex. In conclusion, consistent with imprinting, common polymorphic variation in foetal H19 alleles transmitted only from the mother are associated with birth weight.

British Journal of Nutrition

Gestational diabetes: risk factors and recent advances in its genetics and treat


Published: May 21, 2010 by British Journal of Nutrition
Authors: Petry CJ
Subjects: Biomedical Science, Medicine, Nutrition

This review seeks to highlight recent advances and remaining gaps in knowledge about GDM in terms of its genetics (where some of the recently discovered polymorphic risk factors for type 2 diabetes have also proved to be risk factors for GDM) and its treatment by diet, exercise and drugs.

Diabetes

Raised late pregnancy glucose concentrations in mice carrying pups with targeted


Published: Sep 30, 2009 by Diabetes
Authors: Petry CJ, Evans ML, Wingate DL, Ong KK, Reik W, Constância M, Dunger DB.
Subjects: Biomedical Science

We have hypothesized that variation in imprinted growth-promoting fetal genes may affect maternal glucose concentrations in pregnancy. To test this hypothesis we evaluated the effects of fetal disruption of murine H19(Delta13) on maternal glucose concentrations in pregnancy. At day 16 mothers carrying H19(Delta13)-null pups had a significantly higher area under the glucose tolerance test curves than controls [P = 0.01] in association with increasing pregnancy-related insulin resistance.

Trends in Molecular Medicine

Does the fetal genotype affect maternal physiology during pregnancy?


Published: Sep 27, 2007 by Trends in Molecular Medicine
Authors: Petry CJ, Ong KK, Dunger DB
Subjects: Biomedical Science, Medicine

A review of work whereby the fetal genotype is able to influence the maternal blood pressure and metabolism in pregnancy.

Diabetes Care

Genetics of Size at Birth.


Published: Jul 30, 2007 by Diabetes Care
Authors: Dunger DB, Petry CJ, Ong KK.
Subjects: Biomedical Science, Medicine

A review of the genetics of size at birth.