Lila  Kazemian Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Lila Kazemian

Associate Professor
John Jay College of Criminal Justice

My research has largely focused on the study of changes in offending behavior across time. Specifically, I have investigated the factors that contribute to the process of abandoning criminal behavior, otherwise known as desistance from crime. More recently, I conducted a longitudinal follow-up of long-term French prisoners in order to better understand how the process of desistance from crime operates in the prison setting.

Biography

I am a graduate of Université de Montréal, and I earned my Ph.D. in criminology at the University of Cambridge. I joined the faculty at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York in 2006. My research has focused on the topics of desistance from crime, life-course and criminal career research, prisoner reentry, and comparative criminology. I am particularly interested in understanding how the process of desistance from crime can unfold during lengthy periods of incarceration, and how individuals succeed in achieving positive transformations under seemingly impossible circumstances. The experiences of long-term prisoners reveal valuable insight about positive growth in the face of adversity. The implications of these findings extend far beyond the field of criminology.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    Desistance from crime
    Long-term incarceration
    Prisoner reintegration
    Life-course and criminal career research
    Cross-national research

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Positive Growth and Redemption in Prison: Kazemian - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice

Reliability and validity of cross-national homicide data: A comparison of UN and WHO data


Published: Jan 09, 2017 by International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice
Authors: Catrin Andersson and Lila Kazemian
Subjects: Criminology and Criminal Justice

This study assesses the reliability of cross-national homicide data from the United Nations (UN) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Findings indicate that UN and WHO homicide rates (n=56) differ in magnitude, but produce similar outcomes. The UN data produce more robust results and statistical models with less error. The WHO data are more stable and reliable over time, and better suited for longitudinal analyses.

Criminology & Public Policy

Forgotten prisoners: Imperative for inclusion of long termers and lifers in research and policy


Published: Jan 09, 2015 by Criminology & Public Policy
Authors: Lila Kazemian & Jeremy Travis
Subjects: Criminology and Criminal Justice

By drawing on the relevant empirical research, this article underlines the importance of reorienting some research efforts and policy priorities toward individuals serving life or otherwise long prison sentences. We argue that long-term prisoners can play a key role in shaping the prison community and potentially could contribute to the development of a healthier prison climate.

International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

Conducting Prison Research in a Foreign Setting


Published: Jan 01, 2015 by International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy
Authors: Lila Kazemian
Subjects: Criminology and Criminal Justice

This paper discusses the process of conducting prison research in France. It outlines the major challenges relating to access, data collection, and dissemination of results in prison research. It also addresses some of the barriers that are inherent to prison research conducted in a setting foreign to the researcher. The value and place of prison research in the field of criminology are also discussed.