Marcus  Evans Author of Evaluating Organization Development
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Marcus Evans

Psychoanalyst

Marcus Evans is a psychoanalyst with 40 years’ experience in mental health originally training as a psychiatric nurse. He took up a post as head of the nursing discipline at the Tavistock & Portman NHS Trust post he occupied between 1998-2018). Marcus was Clinical Director of the adult & adolescent departments between 2011 & 2015. He is the author of ‘Making Room for Madness in Mental Health: the psychoanalytic understanding of psychotic communications’ published by Karnac Books.

Biography

I am a member of the British Psychoanalytical Society and the Institute of Psychoanalysis

I  trained and worked as a consultant psychotherapist at the Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust and have over 40 years of experience in mental health as a practitioner, supervisor, lecturer, and manager. I also have had a private practice in Beckenham since 1995.

I was one of the founding members of the Fitzjohn’s Service, for the treatment of patients with severe and enduring mental health conditions and/or personality disorder in the adult department at the Tavistock and I have a longstanding interest in the psychoanalytic understanding and treatment of mental health conditions.

I have written and taught extensively on this subject and I am the author of ‘Making Room for Madness in Mental Health: the psychoanalytic understanding of psychotic communications’ published by Karnac in the Tavistock series.

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    I started my psychiatric nurse training at Springfield hospital in 1980. after qualifying, I took a post at St Giles Day hospital and several years later become the day hospital charge nurse. I then took a post as a clinical nurse specialist running a nurse lead parasuicide and liaison service in King's college hospital, while undertaking the Tavistock training in Adult psychotherapy. After qualifying as a psychotherapist I was the first burst to be appointed by the Tavistock and was made head of nursing, with a remit to develop and expand the nursing discipline within the trust. I developed and delivered the course for front line clinical staff as well as being one of the founding members of the Fitzjohns unit (a clinical unit for the treatment of patients with severe and enduring mental illness and personality disorder. I have taught and supervised psychotherapy pieces of training and in mental health settings over many years. My passion has always been the application of psychoanalytic ideas in mental health settings.

Personal Interests

    Watching sport, mainly cricket and rugby, and keeping fit cycling.

Websites

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Making Room for Madness in Mental Health - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Quillette

First, Do No Harm: A New Model for Treating Trans-Identified Children


Published: Feb 04, 2021 by Quillette
Authors: Susan Evans and Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Gender & Sexuality

We encourage a psychotherapeutic model that provides a process of psychological exploration, in which an individual’s personality structure, beliefs, defence mechanisms, and motivations are assessed and examined in a supportive environment.

BJPsych Bulletin

Freedom to think: the need for thorough assessment and treatment of gender dysphoric children


Published: Dec 04, 2020 by BJPsych Bulletin
Authors: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Gender & Sexuality

Referrals (particularly natal female) to gender identity clinics have increased significantly in recent years. Understanding the reasons for this increase, and how to respond, is hampered by a politically charged debate regarding gender identity. This article starts with a discussion of the so-called ‘affirmative approach’ to gender dysphoria and considers the implications of the Memorandum of Understanding on conversion therapy.

Nursing Standard

Suicide: a target for health


Published: Oct 24, 2020 by Nursing Standard
Authors: Marcus Evans

There were almost 4,000 suicides in England and Wales in 1992, and for every completed suicide there are probably at least 25 attempts. Of these, 10 per cent will succeed. General nurses often have a key role in caring for people who have attempted to take their lives. This article is relevant to the UKCC Professional Development Category of Reducing Risk

Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

Pinned against the ropes: Understanding anti-social personality-disordered patients through use of the counter-transference


Published: Oct 24, 2020 by Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy
Authors: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Criminology and Criminal Justice

In this paper the author draws upon literature in this area and suggests that this dichotomy between the psychotic and the anti-social may be too simple and argues that if we can understand that psychotic processes may well also underlie the personality disorders, we may reach a better understanding of what takes place in these settings and how staff are affected by the patients. In order to function effectively, staff need regular, on-going supervision.

Quilette

Why I Resigned from Tavistock: Trans-Identified Children Need Therapy, Not Just ‘Affirmation’ and Drugs


Published: Oct 24, 2020 by Quilette
Authors: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Gender & Sexuality

Over the past five years, there has been a 400 percent rise in referrals to the Tavistock Centre in north London, the only National Health Service (NHS) clinic in Britain that treats children with gender-identity developmental issues. Now, a significant majority are biological females who claim to have a male gender identity, often following the rapid onset of gender dysphoria in their teenage years.

Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

The role of psychoanalytic assessment in the management and care of a psychotic patient


Published: Oct 24, 2020 by Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy
Authors: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Psychological Science

The pressure on mental health services to move patients on quickly, and the emphasis on the recovery model, can encourage a superficial assessment of the patient's difficulties. A psychoanalytic assessment can offer a dynamic picture of deeper psychic structures in the patient's internal world. This is particularly important with psychotic patients who may successfully use denial and rationalization to cover up their underlying psychopathology.

Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

MAKING ROOM FOR MADNESS IN MENTAL HEALTH: THE IMPORTANCE OF ANALYTICALLY‐INFORMED SUPERVISION OF NURSES AND OTHER MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS


Published: Oct 23, 2020 by Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy
Authors: Marcus Evans

In this paper, I discuss the importance of psychoanalytically informed supervision and training of nurses and other professionals in mental health settings. Using examples from supervision groups I will illustrate how a psychoanalytic approach to mental health can complement other ways of thinking about practice and management. Psychoanalysis provides a framework for understanding the relationship between the internal world of the patients, the therapeutic relationship and the social system.

Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

BEING DRIVEN MAD: TOWARDS UNDERSTANDING BORDERLINE AND OTHER DISTURBED STATES OF MIND THROUGH THE USE OF THE COUNTER‐TRANSFERENCE


Published: Oct 20, 2020 by Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy
Authors: Marcus Evans

In this paper material is presented from supervision groups run for nurses and other mental health professionals. The patients presented to the group came from different mental health settings with a diagnosis that included borderline features and/or other disturbing states of mind. All of the patients described caused strong counter-transference feelings of sympathy, confusion, anger, hopelessness and guilt.

BJPsych bulletin

Freedom to think: the need for a thorough assessment and treatment of gender dysphoric children


Published: Oct 15, 2020 by BJPsych bulletin
Authors: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Gender & Sexuality

Referrals (particularly natal female) to gender identity clinics have increased significantly in recent years. Understanding the reasons for this increase, and how to respond, is hampered by a politically charged debate regarding gender identity. I then say something about the relationship between gender dysphoria and the developmental problems that are characteristic of adolescence.

Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, Volume 28, 2014-issue 2

‘I'm beyond caring’, a response to the Francis Report: the failure of social systems in health care to adequately support nurses and nursing in the clinical care of their patients


Published: Oct 15, 2020 by Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, Volume 28, 2014-issue 2
Authors: Marcus Evans

Lord Francis was commissioned to look at why the serious problems (between January 2005 and March 2009) at Mid Staffs Foundation Trust were not identified sooner and the appropriate action taken. Lord Francis was also asked to outline what lessons could be learned to enhance patient care. The key message was that the National Health Service needed to put the patient first and everything else should flow from that principle.

https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rpps20/current

Catch 22: the inflammatory nature of insight


Published: Oct 15, 2020 by https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rpps20/current
Authors: Marcus Evans

I will describe a man I saw in psychoanalytic psychotherapy with a history of serious drug abuse and violent psychotic episodes. Over time and with the support of the therapy he was able to increase his capacity for self-observation noticing the way he withdrew from the world of shared reality into psychotic states of mind in order to avoid painful feelings of rage, humiliation and shame.

PSCYHOANALYTIC PSYCHOTHERAPY

Can anybody hear me? Reacting to pressures from psychotic states of mind


Published: Jun 17, 2008 by PSCYHOANALYTIC PSYCHOTHERAPY
Authors: MARCUS EVANS

In this paper material is presented from supervision groups run for nurses and other mental health professionals. The patients presented to the group all came from different mental health settings and suffered from psychotic states of mind. In this paper, I will argue that the psychodynamic model can help nurses and other front-line mental health professionals in their understanding of the psychotic process.

News

MARCUS EVANS : POURQUOI J’AI DÉMISSIONNÉ DU CENTRE TAVISTOCK [1/3]

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

Les enfants se plaignant de dysphorie de genre ont besoin d’un accompagnement psychologique, plutôt que d’être confortés dans leurs convictions et orientés hâtivement vers des traitements hormonaux

 

Marcus Evans est psychanalyste. Il a travaillé en tant que psychothérapeute consultant et directeur associé du Service Adolescent et Adulte au Comité Tavistock and Portman. Il est l’auteur du livre Making room for Madness in Mental Health: The Psychoanalytic Understanding of Psychotic Communication.

 

Cet article a été publié dans le média anglophone Quillette et traduit pour L’Incorrect par Alfred Sibleyras

 

 

Girls must bow to trans rights in new rules for schools

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

Male pupils who choose to change gender will be allowed to use female changing rooms, a leaked document reveals

New guidelines on transgender pupils for primary and secondary schools in England and Wales have been criticised for “ignoring the rights of girls”.

The confidential draft document from the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), seen by The Sunday Times, is expected to be introduced in October.

 

Letters to the Editor: Trans clinic is failing vulnerable children

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

Your article “Sex-change sorrow” (News Review, last week) highlighted the Tavistock Centre, England’s only clinic devoted to treating transgender children. I am the governor who resigned from the Tavistock board after Dr David Bell wrote a report containing staff concerns about the rush to medical intervention, which bypassed thorough psychological evaluation.

I did so because I believed the trust tried to bury these important concerns about an experimental treatment of vulnerable children. It also displayed its prejudice by trying to discredit Dr Bell, a respected clinician, and the staff he spoke to.

NHS child gender reassignment 'too quick'

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

England's only NHS youth gender clinic is too quick to give children and young people gender reassignment treatment, a former governor has said.

Psychoanalyst Dr Marcus Evans, who resigned last week, told the BBC's Today programme he had been concerned about clinicians searching for "quick solutions".

"This is the opposite of what needs to be done," he said.

A director of the Tavistock Centre rejected his claims.

Dr Evans resigned from his post as one of the governors of the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust last week following an internal report that branded the Tavistock Centre "not fit for purpose".

On Monday, he told Today: "Adolescence and childhood is a time when people are developing socially and biologically - a time when young people are identifying with different groups, and with male and female aspects of themselves.

"There is pressure from the child who is in a distressed state, there is pressure from the family and the peer group and from the pro-trans lobbies - and all of this puts pressure on the clinician who may want to help the individual to resolve their distressed state by going along with a quick solution.

"There is a lot at stake here as these decisions have far reaching consequences."

Dr Evans called for more external oversight of the Tavistock Clinic.

The damning verdict on puberty blocker treatment for trans children

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

If the Keira Bell judgment did not sufficiently expose the shortcomings of the Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS) – the only NHS clinic in England for children presenting with gender dysphoria – then another recent study published after that key ruling must surely now trigger a full-blown inquiry.

The study followed the progress of 44 children referred by GIDS for puberty blockers when they were aged between 12 and 15. All except one – 98 per cent of the cohort – progressed to cross sex-hormones. The lead author was Dr Polly Carmichael, GIDS director. The research has yet to be peer reviewed, but let's be clear: this was a study of patients at GIDS, and the results were reported by the director of the clinic herself. So was this information shared with the high court judges who heard Keira Bell's case? 

It would seem not. In their decision, Dame Victoria Sharp, president of the Queen’s bench division, Lord Justice Lewis and Mrs Justice Lieven expressed surprise that 'GIDS did not obtain full data showing the figures and the proportion of those on puberty blockers who remain within GIDS and move on to cross-sex hormones'. While the study obviously does not include every child seen by GIDS, the information it contains would undoubtedly have been useful to the high court. 

For one, it would have made it difficult for GIDS to maintain the delusion that puberty blockers and cross-sex hormones are separate treatments. According to a passage in the high court judgement:

'GIDS and the (NHS) Trust place reliance on the fact that Stage 1 treatment with PBs (puberty blockers) and Stage 2 treatment (Cross-Sex Hormones) are separate. Thus, so it is said, it is possible for a young person to come off the PBs at any point and not proceed to taking CSH'. 

It is rather harder to defend that claim when 98 per cent of those mentioned in this latest study remained on a conveyor belt from one to the other.

Psychoanalyst Dr Marcus Evans, who last year resigned as a governor of The Tavistock and Portman NHS Trust (which operates GIDS) over the management of the service, said he believes the Tavistock thinks it is beyond scrutiny: 

'I think this attitude is symptomatic of a system that believes it should not be questioned.'

Irish children sent to London clinic caught in gender storm

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

One hundred Irish children have been sent to England over the past three years to be assessed at a clinic caught in a controversy over fast-tracking gender transition.

The Tavistock Clinic in London, the main gender clinic for children in Ireland and England, is under the spotlight after the resignation of whistle-blowing clinicians who claim children were being incorrectly diagnosed with gender dysphoria.

The most recent figures released from the English clinic's Gender Identity Development Services show that 38 Irish children attended their service from June 2017 to June 2018, while 35 children were referred the previous year.

Since 2010, 117 boys and girls from Ireland have been referred to the specialist NHS clinic in London which treats transgender children; and in the past three years there has been a sharp rise in referrals of children feeling unhappy about their biological sex.

The children, aged eight to 17, are initially psychologically assessed in the Tavistock Clinic in the UK while treatment, which can involve puberty blockers in some cases, is now mainly carried out in the Our Lady's Children's Hospital in Dublin.

Consultant Psychotherapist Marcus Evans, one of the former governors of the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust, resigned over concerns that the youth gender clinic was too quick to give children and young people gender reassignment treatment.

Dr Evans, who had a 34-year association with the trust, said he believed the clinic needed oversight from an independent body.

"I do not have confidence, and that's why I resigned, that the trust is taking the necessary steps to make sure that children are being adequately cared for," he said.

Five Staff Resign at Leading UK Transgender Youth Clinic

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

Allegations of misdiagnoses and unsubstantiated use of puberty blocking and cross-sex hormones in young people has led to the resignation of five clinicians from the UK's only publicly funded Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS) according to an investigation by The Times newspaper. 

The article, published earlier this week, says the five unnamed staff believe some children were misdiagnosed as "transgender" when they were actually experiencing same-sex attractions. The young people were referred for hormone treatment without proper exploration of the possibility that they may be gay instead, the clinicians claim

 

'Highly politicised' transgender groups are putting children at risk and school chiefs and mental bosses are bowing to

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

Children's mental health service providers and school councillors are scared of being labelled transphobic by pro-trans groups, leading them to overlook the interests of the patient, says a gender psychotherapist.

Marcus Evans, psychotherapist and former governor at the NHS's only trust with a Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS), said that pressure from the 'highly-politicised' pro-trans groups is having an affect on the way mental health providers treat children.  

Fear of being labelled transphobic by pro-trans groups is leading experts providing counselling and transitioning services to lose objectivity when advising children with gender dysphoria, said Mr Evans.

Why do so many teenage girls want to change gender?

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Developmental Psychology, Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

It is commonly acknowledged that while biological sex is genetically determined, gender is a social construct. A human being cannot—and should not—be reduced to their biology, or indeed their genitals, because psychologically we are as much a product of the way that other people treat us as we are of our genetic inheritance. Homo sapiens are social creatures: our ability to cooperate is what gave us the evolutionary upper hand over our stronger Neanderthal cousins. Without parents, siblings, peers, colleagues, friends and lovers our idea of ourselves would remain ill-defined—we wouldn’t know who we were.

Imagine you were raised by wolves in a cave—let’s call you Mowgli—but then later met another human of the opposite sex. You would notice the physiological differences. But as to interpreting those differences, where would you start? Without being exposed to the concept of “man” or “woman”—let alone “laddish” or “girly”—you’d lack any mental map to provide the pointers to the typically “male” and “female” behaviour instilled in us by human society.

Precisely because gender is a social construct, the evolution of its boundaries and meanings will tell us something fundamental about our society. And gender-wise something really big is going on in the UK—but it’s not the big something you might think.

Transsexuality is a talking point like never before, and a glance at the figures sheds some light on why. The number of children, in particular, being referred to the Tavistock and Portman Foundation Trust’s gender identity development service (Gids)—the NHS service through which all UK candidates for a sex change under 18 are funnelled—is up from 77 in 2009 to 2,590 in 2018-9. But what’s almost as dramatic as the headline numbers are developments in who is transitioning. In November 2017, the Guardian reported that 70 per cent of referrals were female. This was a surprising statistic because only 10 years previously the overall ratio had been more like 75 per cent males seeking to be female, and indeed it is still the gender traffic in that direction that dominates the increasingly noisy, divisive and panic-inflected debate.

Recently, though, alarm bells have begun to ring among a handful of psychiatric professionals about the number of teenage girls arriving at the Tavistock’s door and the nature of their treatment. Right now a legal case is being brought by Susan Evans, a former psychiatric nurse at the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust, alongside a parent of an autistic female child wishing to transition to be male, arguing that children are not legally capable of consenting to a gender transition. November last year saw the launch of the Detransition Advocacy Network, a UK group numbering several hundred members. And in January, the NHS announced an independent review into puberty suppressants and cross-sex hormone treatments, to be chaired by Hilary Cass, formerly president of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health.

But until the end of 2019, you could be forgiven for thinking that a panic about trans women using the “wrong” toilet cubicles was the biggest gender issue of the day (instead of something that could be easily solved by affording everyone the same privacy). Whenever the issue flares up politically—as when the Labour leadership candidates were asked to sign a pledge that labelled trans rights sceptics as “hate groups,” or the Scottish government proposed reforms to allow a change of legal gender without a medical diagnosis of gender dysphoria—it always seems to come back to loos and changing rooms. These vitriolic debates keep bubbling up—especially online.

But there is a much bigger scandal brewing than any Twitterstorm. While there have been a great many thoughtful doctors at the Tavistock, the picture is sometimes disturbing. Marcus Evans, a psychotherapist and former governor of the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust, resigned in February 2019, citing an institutional rush to prescribe puberty-blocking hormone treatment to children questioning their gender and who may wish to transition. “The Tavistock is behaving recklessly with these kids who are in a distressed state,” he claims. What’s especially odd about the alleged rush to prescribe rather than consider alternatives, he argues, is that this clinic’s international reputation was built on the quality of its talking therapy.

“Over the last five to 10 years there has been a complete change in the profile of the people presenting,” says Evans. “These children believe that they are in the wrong body and they are very persistent and forceful in saying that they want a solution—and that that is physical intervention. But I’ve been in psychiatry for 40 years and when people are in a distressed state they often narrow things down and fix on one thing as a solution, putting pressure on clinicians for a magic bullet.”

In psychiatry “generally,” he says, the aim is to “open things out,” and take the time to ask questions about “what is going on.” After all, “adolescence is a moving picture. We move through experimenting with different identities as our bodies change and our role in society changes. An individual has to tolerate a -certain amount of confusion and anxiety and we should be able to help with that through therapy.” But when it comes to “the Tavistock’s gender identity service,” he says, “this work has not been done… the entire area has become unnecessarily politicised.”

Politicised trans groups put children at risk, says expert

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

School counsellors and mental health service providers are bowing to pressures from ‘highly politicised’ transgender groups to affirm children’s beliefs that they were born the wrong sex, a leading expert has warned.

Marcus Evans, a psychotherapist and ex-governor of the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust, whose Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS) is the only NHS clinic to provide gender counselling and transitioning, said many experts were living in fear of being labelled transphobic, which was having an impact on their objectivity.

Is the Tavistock gender clinic failing children?

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Developmental Psychology, Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

For 24 years, the Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS), headquartered at the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust in North London, has been seeing, counselling and treating adolescents and children diagnosed with ‘gender dysphoria’. This, as the NHS describes it, is ‘the sense of unease that a person may have because of a mismatch between their biological sex and their gender’.

For much of GIDS’ existence, few paid it much attention. But over the past 10 years all that has changed. Not only have transgenderissues become the object of fierce public controversy and mootedgovernment legislation, but diagnoses of gender dysphoria among children and adolescents have skyrocketed. As The Sunday Timesreported last year: ‘Since 2009-10… there has been an increase of more than 3,200 per cent in patients referred to GIDS, from 77 that year to 2,590 in the year to April.’ Moreover, 2019 was the first time the majority (54 per cent) of patients referred to the clinic were 14 or under – some patients were as young as four.

Unsurprisingly, GIDS’ activity at the Tavistock has been subject to increasing public attention, and, more recently, scrutiny. In 2018, an internal report, by then staff governor Dr David Bell, effectively accused GIDS of fast-tracking children and adolescents for gender transition. Featuring damning quotes from whistle-blowing clinicians and unhappy staff members, it reinforced the growing sense that GIDS has been a little too eager to encourage young people to transition and potentially undergo life-changing medical treatment. Indeed, since 2017, over 35 clinicians have quit GIDS because they are worried about ‘overdiagnoses’ of gender dysphoria. Sonia Appleby, who works at GIDS as its Named Professional for Safeguarding Children, is even bringing a case against the Tavistockon the grounds that it is failing in its duty to safeguard children, by encouraging staff not to report any child safety concerns to her.

 

In some ways, however, the controversy in which GIDS now seems mired is a mark of just how far it has come.

 

Vulnerable youngsters rushed into treatment. Staff too nervous to speak out: After resigning from controversial Tavistoc

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

For four decades, I have devoted my career to trying to understand people who are greatly distressed and confused.

As an adult psychotherapist, I deal with patients who may express their feelings in challenging ways.

But my role is to pay careful attention and to try to tune in to what isn’t being said; the hidden aspects of a patient’s story.

The key to achieving this is patience, time and slow-moving, dogged determination — words that aren’t fashionable in a fast-paced world intent on quick fixes and budget cuts. 

But it’s my view that to try to treat vulnerable patients in any other way can be hugely damaging.

This is, in part, the reason I resigned from my post as governor of The Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust last week.

A leaked internal report had branded the Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS) at The Tavistock Centre, England’s only NHS youth gender clinic, ‘not fit for purpose’. 

Psychotherapists avoid questioning children who want to be transgender as they fear conversion therapy accusations

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Adolescent Studies, Developmental Psychology, Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

Conversion therapy, which traditionally applied to sexuality, now includes 'gender identity' in the NHS

Governor of Tavistock Foundation quits over damning report into gender identity clinic

By: Marcus Evans
Subjects: Gender & Sexuality, Psychology

The trust running the country’s only NHS gender identity service for children is under fire for dismissing a damning internal report that branded it “not fit for purpose”.

Marcus Evans, one of the governors of The Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust has resigned, after accusing its management of having an “overvalued belief in” the expertise of its Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS) “which is used to dismiss challenge and examination”.

Videos

interview with podcast trigonometry

Published: Jan 14, 2021

interview with trigonometry

The Keira Bell Case and A New Therapeutic Model

Published: Dec 30, 2020

Marcus Evans discusses his concerns about the "affirmation" model and the medical treatment path advocated by Tavistock's Gender Identity Development Service. He offers important insights into how experimental and harmful treatments became the accepted norm for vulnerable children suffering with identity issues.

The Trans Train - A Swedish Documentary

Published: Dec 22, 2020

A documentary on the transitioning of young people in Sweden

No such thing as specialism in gender dysphoria

Published: Aug 19, 2019

Marcus Evans - Psychiatry sits on a knife edge

Published: Oct 20, 2020

marcus evans

Published: Jun 15, 2020

British Psychotherapy foundation hosted Marcus Evans presenting his book Making Room for Madness in Mental Health: The Psychoanalytic Understanding of Psychotic Communications.