April  Baker-Bell Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

April Baker-Bell

Associate Professor of Language, Literacy, and English Education
Michigan State University

Former High School English Language Arts Teacher | Teacher-Researcher-Activist | Co-Founder of BlackLangaugeSyllabus.Com

Biography


Dr. April Baker-Bell is a transdisciplinary teacher-researcher-activist and Associate Professor of Language, Literacy, and English Education in the Department of English and Department of African American and African Studies at Michigan State University. A national leader in conversations on Black Language education, her research interrogates the intersections of Black language and literacies, anti-Black racism, and antiracist pedagogies, and is concerned with antiracist writing, critical media literacies, Black feminist-womanist storytelling, and self-preservation for Black women in academia, with an emphasis on early career Black women.

Baker-Bell’s award-winning book, Linguistic Justice: Black Language, Literacy, Identity, and Pedagogy, brings together theory, research, and practice to dismantle Anti-Black Linguistic Racism (a term Baker-Bell coined) and white linguistic supremacy. The book provides ethnographic snapshots of how Black students navigate and negotiate their linguistic and racial identities across multiple contexts, and it captures what Antiracist Black Language Pedagogy looks like in community with Black youth. Linguistic Justice features a range of multimodal examples and practices through instructional maps, charts, artwork, and stories that reflect the urgent need for antiracist language pedagogies in our current social and political climate.
 
Baker-Bell is the recipient of many awards and fellowships, including the 2020 NCTE George Orwell Award for Distinguished Contribution to Honesty and Clarity in Public Language, the 2020 Michigan State University's Distinguished Partnership Award for Community-Engaged Creative Activity, the 2019 Michigan State University Alumni Award for Innovation & Leadership in Teaching and Learning, and the 2018 AERA Language and Social Processes Early Career Scholar Award. Baker-Bell’s research has been published in The Journal of Language and Literacy Education (JoLLE), English Education, The Journal of Literacy Research (JLR), The Journal of International Review of Qualitative Research, and Theory into Practice.

Books

News

Linguistic Justice wins the National Council of Teachers of English's George Orwell Award for Distinguished Contribution

By: April Baker-Bell

"Dr. April Baker-Bell is the recipient of the 2020 National Council of Teachers of English's George Orwell Award for Distinguished Contribution for her book Linguistic Justice: Black Language, Literacy, Identity, and Pedagogy. Lingusitic Justice is a powerful call to both critically analyze and criticize language instruction and its corresponding ideologies in the English Language Arts classroom. Introducing Anti-Black Linguistic Racism, which “describes the linguistic violence, persecution, dehumanization, and marginalization that Black Language-speakers experience in schools and in everyday life” (p. 11), Dr. Baker-Bell calls for the celebration of Black students and Black Language in all spaces, focusing on the rich literacy practices and experiences of Black youth. Her book, timely and important, highlights the need to re-envision language education so that we can end racism and linguistic violence in classrooms.book, Linguistic Justice: Black Language, Literacy, Identity, and Pedagogy, is a powerful call to both critically analyze and criticize language instruction and its corresponding ideologies in the English Language Arts classroom. Introducing Anti-Black Linguistic Racism, which “describes the linguistic violence, persecution, dehumanization, and marginalization that Black Language-speakers experience in schools and in everyday life” (p. 11), Dr. Baker-Bell calls for the celebration of Black students and Black Language in all spaces, focusing on the rich literacy practices and experiences of Black youth. Her book, timely and important, highlights the need to re-envision language education so that we can end racism and linguistic violence in classrooms."