Jack  de la Torre Author of Evaluating Organization Development
FEATURED AUTHOR

Jack de la Torre

Professor of Psychology
University of Texas

My research on the biological actions of DMSO began in the early 1970's as an Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at the University of Chicago. I found that DMSO showed remarkable properties in lowering intracranial pressure and increasing blood flow to the brain when injected intravenously in non-human primates who had sustained a controlled, traumatic brain injury. The brain trauma work using DMSO was further examined in stroke and spinal cord injured animals with similar beneficial results.

Biography

My research on the biological actions of DMSO began in the early 1970's as an Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery at the University of Chicago. I found that DMSO showed remarkable properties in lowering intracranial pressure and increasing blood flow to the brain when injected intravenously in non-human primates who had sustained a controlled, traumatic brain injury. The brain trauma work using DMSO was further examined in stroke and spinal cord injured animals with similar beneficial results.

Previous to my appointment at the University of Chicago, I had spent 3 years doing neuropathology research on Parkinson’s disease, and brain neurotransmitters as a doctoral student at the University of Geneva. Through the years, my interests in the brain grew to include traumatic brain injury, stroke and more recently, Alzheimer’s disease. My MD and PhD were appetizers to my deep fascination with the brain. I am presently continuing my research at the University of Texas, Austin, as a Professor of Psychology (Adjunct).

Areas of Research / Professional Expertise

    traumatic brain injury
    stroke
    Alzheimer’s disease
    neurosurgery
    DMSO
    neuropathology
    brain neurotransmitters

Books

Featured Title
 Featured Title - Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) in Trauma and Disease - 1st Edition book cover

Articles

Biofactors

A turning point for Alzheimer's disease?


Published: Mar 16, 2012 by Biofactors
Authors: Jack C. de la Torre
Subjects: Biomedical Science, Chemistry, Medicine

Despite an archive of over 73,000 research papers published in the last two decades on the subject of Alzheimer's disease (AD), little clinical progress has been made relative to how people get sporadic AD and what can be done to help them avoid it. This review spotlights strategic steps that could be a turning point in the dramatic lowering of Alzheimer prevalence. The main strategy includes application of four pillars of prevention.