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News About Layla AbdelRahim

How Children's Literature Links to Narcissism and Violence - Layla AbdelRahim, interview, Psychology Today

  • Oct 09, 2018 |

    Evolutionary biologist Marc Bekoff interviews Layla AbdelRahim for Psychology Today:

    "My book offers an analysis of how narratives of civilisation centre the interests of the “owners” and the “agents”, i.e. of those who are economically and politically dominant and silences the voices of the suffering to continue their exploitation. In this manner, the public discourse frames the perspective of the predator in terms of truth and the voices that challenge the naturalness of predation as lie. My hope is that this book will provide a new lens through which to understand our anthropology – or self-knowledge as predators – and to rewild (link is external) ourselves, starting with our narratives and socio-environmental economy and ending with our language and dreams.

    ... If we are to halt the impending anthropogenic catastrophe, we need to identify the ways in which we have disrupted the system of life on this planet. To do that, we need to do three things: get outside our narcissistic narratives; cede our self-designated place as top predator; and re-integrate ourselves into wild economies, in which we cherish and respect the self-realisation and wellbeing of each creature regardless of species or whether they hold any value for us. This is what I mean by rewilding".

     

    For more info about the author and the book, please visit HERE

    Full interview in the link below:

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    Subjects
    Anthropology - Soc Sci, Applied Linguistics, Art & Visual Culture, Built Environment, Cognitive Psychology, Communication Studies, Communications Studies, Developmental Psychology, Economics, Finance, Business & Industry, Education, English Language & Linguistics, Environment and Agriculture , Environment and Sustainability, Geography , Health Psychology, History, Literature, Philosophy, Psychology, Social Psychology, Sociology, Sociology & Social Policy, Sociology, Criminology and Criminal Justice