Path Dependence and Creation

Edited by Raghu Garud, Peter Karnoe

© 2001 – Psychology Press

440 pages

Purchasing Options:
New in Paperback: 9780415650717
pub: 2012-08-16
US Dollars$54.95
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Hardback: 9780805832723
pub: 2001-02-01
US Dollars$100.00
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About the Book

The editors, aware of the recent work in evolutionary theory and the science of chaos and complexity, challenge the sometimes deterministic flavor of this subject. They are interested in uncovering the place of agency in these theories that take history so seriously. In the end, they are as interested in path creation and destruction as they are in path dependence.

This book is compiled of both theoretical and empirical writings. It shows relatively well-known industries, such as the automobile, biotechnology, and semi-conductor industries in a new light. It also invites the reader to learn more about medical practices, wind power, lasers, and synthesizers.

Primarily written for academicians, researchers, and Ph.D. students in fields related to technology management, this book is research-oriented and will appeal to all managers.

Reviews

"Individually, each chapter is informative and well worth reading….Garud and Karnoe deliver a set of papers that are each individually interesting and nicely crafted, rendering the volume as a whole both useful and provocative….the volume will make a nice addition to individual scholars' bookshelves and institutions' libraries…"

Administrative Science Quarterly

Table of Contents

Contents: A.P. Brief, J.P. Walsh, Series Editors' Foreword. Preface. R. Garud, P. Karnøe, Path Creation as a Process of Mindful Deviation. Part I:Path Dependence and Beyond. A.P. Bassanini, G. Dosi, When and How Chance and Human Will Can Twist the Arms of Clio: An Essay on Path Dependence in a World of Irreversibilities. P.M. Hirsch, J.J. Gillespie, Unpacking Path Dependence: Differential Valuations Accorded History Across Disciplines. V.W. Ruttan, Sources of Technical Change: Induced Innovation, Evolutionary Theory, and Path Dependence. Part II:From Path Dependence to Path Creation. M. Kenney, U. von Burg, Paths and Regions: The Creation and Growth of Silicon Valley. R.N. Langlois, D.A. Savage, Standards, Modularity, and Innovation: The Case of Medical Practice. J.A.C. Baum, B.S. Silverman, Complexity, Attractors, and Path Dependence and Creation in Technological Evolution. Part III:Path Creation as Co-Evolution. J.F. Porac, J.A. Rosa, J. Spanjol, M.S. Saxon, America's Family Vehicle: Path Creation in the U.S. Minivan Market. H. Rao, J. Singh, The Construction of New Paths: Institution-Building Activity in the Early Automobile and Biotech Industries. R. Kemp, A. Rip, J. Schot, Constructing Transition Paths Through the Management of Niches. Part IV:Path Creation as Mobilization. J. Lampel, Show-and-Tell: Product Demonstrations and Path Creation of Technological Change. B. Van Looy, K. Debackere, R. Bouwen, Innovation as a Community-Spanning Process: Looking for Interaction Strategies to Handle Path Dependency. J. Mouritsen, N. Dechow, Technologies of Managing and the Mobilization of Paths. T. Pinch, Why Do You Go to a Piano Store to Buy a Synthesizer?: Path Dependence and the Social Construction of Technology.

About the Series

Series in Organization and Management

The Series in Organization and Management publishes books that establish innovative avenues of inquiry or significantly alter the course of contemporary research in an established area.

Taking a broad view of the domain of organization and management scholarship, the editors seek to publish theoretical and empirical works grounded in a variety of disciplinary perspectives that focus on units of analysis ranging from individuals to industries. In addition, the series welcomes purely methodological contributions, as well as edited volumes of original essays.

Manuscript proposals should be sent to: Art Brief, Department of Management, University of Utah, 1645 E Campus Center Drive #105, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-9304 (arthur.brief@business.utah.edu ), Michael Frese (michfrese@googlemail.com ), Kim Elsbach (kdelsbach@ucdavis.edu ) or Lauren Verity (lauren.verity@taylorandfrancis.com).

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
BUS041000
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS / Management