After Legal Equality

Family, Sex, Kinship

Edited by Robert Leckey

© 2015 – Routledge

224 pages

Purchasing Options:
Hardback: 9780415721615
pub: 2014-07-03
US Dollars$145.00
x

Look Inside

About the Book

Groups seeking legal equality often take a victory as the end of the line. Once judgment is granted or a law is passed, coalitions disband and life goes on in a new state of equality. Policy makers too may assume that a troublesome file is now closed. This collection arises from the urgent sense that law reforms driven by equality call for fresh lines of inquiry. In unintended ways, reforms may harm their intended beneficiaries. They may also worsen the disadvantage of other groups. Committed to tackling these important issues beyond the boundaries that often confine legal scholarship, this book pursues an interdisciplinary consideration of efforts to advance equality, as it explores the developments, challenges, and consequences that arise from law reforms aiming to deliver equality in the areas of sexuality, kinship, and family relations. With an international array of contributors, After Legal Equality: Family, Sex, Kinship will be an invaluable resource for those with interests in this area.

Table of Contents

Introduction: After Equality Robert Leckey, Part One: Care under Neo-liberalism 1. Making Family Law Less Sexy … And More Careful Jonathan Herring, 2. Equality: An Uncomfortable Fit in Parenting Law Susan B. Boyd, 3. Men, Gender and Fathers’ Rights ‘After Equality’: New Formations of Rights and Responsibility in Family Justice Richard Collier, 4. Economic Justice after Legal Equality: The Case for Caring Queerly Janet R. Jakobsen, Part Two: States’ Reach 5. Cameos from the Margins of Conjugality Kim Brooks, 6. Leaping without Looking Helen Reece, 7. Taxing Times for Lesbians and Gay Men: 20 Years Later Claire Young, 8. The Historiographical Operations of Gay Rights Roderick Ferguson, Part Three: Sex and Love 9. Tackling Inequality in the Intimate Sphere: Problematizing Love and Violence in Same-Sex Relationships Catherine Donovan, 10. Parenting after Equality: (Re)Inscribing the Heteronormative Family Rosie Harding, 11. Sexuality and Children Post-Equality Daniel Monk

About the Editor

Robert Leckey is associate professor and William Dawson Scholar in the Faculty of Law, McGill University, where he conducts research in comparative family and constitutional law. He is author of Contextual Subjects: Family, State, and Relational Theory and co-editor of Queer Theory: Law, Culture, Empire.

About the Series

Social Justice

Within a broad geopolitical and intellectual landscape, this new, theoretically engaged, interdisciplinary series explores institutional and grassroots practices of social justice across a range of spatial scales. While the pursuit of social justice is as important as it has ever been, its character, conditions, values, and means of advancement are being radically questioned and rethought in the light of contemporary challenges and choices. Attuned to these varied and evolving contexts, Social Justice explores the complex conditions social justice politics confronts and inhabits – of crisis, shock, and erosion, as well as renewal and social invention, of change as well as continuity.

Foregrounding struggle, imagined alternatives and the embedding of new norms, the Social Justice series welcomes books which critically and normatively address the values underpinning new social politics, everyday forms of embodied practice, new dissident knowledges, and struggles to institutionalise change. In particular, the series seeks to explore state and non-state forms of organisation, analysing the different pathways through which social justice projects are put into practice, and the contests their practice generates. More generally, submissions are welcomed exploring the following themes:

• The changing politics of equality and social justice

• The establishment of alternative, organised sites and networks through which social and political experimentation take place

• The phenomenology of power, inequality and changing social relations

• Techniques of governance through which social change and equality agendas are advanced and institutionalised across different geographic scales

• Institutionalisation of new norms (through official and unofficial forms of institutionalisation) and struggles over them

• Practices of resistance, reversal, counter-hegemony and anti-normativity

• Changing values, practices, and the ways in which relations of inequality and difference are understood

Social Justice is intended as a critical interdisciplinary series, at the interface of law, social theory, politics and cultural studies. The series welcomes proposals that advance theoretical discussion about social justice, power, institutions, grass-roots practice and values/ ethics. Seeking to develop new conversations across different disciplines and fields, and working with wide-ranging methodologies, Social Justice seeks contributions that are open, engaging, and which speak to a wide, diverse academic audience across all areas of the law, social sciences and humanities.

For further information on the series, or to discuss a possible contribution, please contact the Series Editors at:

 

Sarah Lamble
School of Law, Birkbeck College 
University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX
Tel: +44 (0)207 631 6017
S.lamble@bbk.ac.uk

Davina Cooper, Kent Law School, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NZ, UK
Tel: +44 (1227) 824172
d.s.cooper@kent.ac.uk

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
LAW000000
LAW / General
LAW038030
LAW / Family Law / Marriage
LAW043000
LAW / Gender & the Law