Online Reporting of Elections

Edited by Einar Thorsen

© 2013 – Routledge

138 pages

Purchasing Options:
Hardback: 9780415827515
pub: 2013-04-29
US Dollars$160.00
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About the Book

This book contributes to debates concerning online reporting of elections and the challenges facing journalism in the context of democratic change. The speed of technological adaptation by journalists and their audiences means online news is gradually becoming a normalised part of media landscapes across the world. Journalists monitor social media for insight into the political process and as an instant indication of "public sentiment", rather than waiting for press releases and opinion polls. Citizens are actively participating in online political reporting too, through publishing eyewitness accounts, political commentary, crowd-sourcing and fact-checking information (of political manifestos and media reports alike). It is therefore growing increasingly important to understand how political journalism is evolving through new communicative forms and practices, in order to critique its epistemological role and function in democratic societies, and examine how these interventions influence daily online political reporting across different national contexts.

This volume covers comparative, research-based studies across a range of national contexts and electoral systems, including Australia, ten African countries, the European Union, Greece, the Netherlands, India, Iran, Sweden, the UK and the USA.

This book was originally published as a special issue of Journalism Practice.

Table of Contents

Foreword Bob Franklin 1. Introduction: Online reporting of elections Einar Thorsen 2. "The People’s Debate": The CNN/YouTube debates and the demotic voice in political journalism Matt Carlson and Eran Ben-Porath 3. Remediating #Iranelection: Journalistic strategies for positioning citizen-made snapshots and text bites from the 2009 Iranian post-election conflict Rune Saugmann Andersen 4. Online Journalism and Election Reporting in India Saayan Chattopadhyay 5. A Journey Through 10 Countries: Online election coverage in Africa Ben Akoh and Kwami Ahiabenu, II 6. "Second-Order" Elections and Online Journalism: A comparison of the 2009 European Parliament elections’ coverage in Greece, Sweden and the United Kingdom Asimina Michailidou 7. (Not) The Twitter Election: The dynamics of the #ausvotes conversation in relation to the Australian media ecology Jean Burgess and Axel Bruns 8. Social Media as Beat: Tweets as a news source during the 2010 British and Dutch elections Marcel Broersma and Todd Graham

About the Editor

Einar Thorsen is Senior Lecturer in Journalism and Communication at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK. His research focuses on online and citizen journalism, particularly during crisis and conflicts, and in response to political and environmental change. He has published research on BBC News Online, Wikinews and WikiLeaks.

About the Series

Journalism Studies

Theory and Practice

The journal Journalism Studies was established at the turn of the new millennium by Bob Franklin. It was launched in the context of a burgeoning interest in the scholarly study of journalism and an expansive global community of journalism scholars and researchers. The ambition was to provide a forum for the critical discussion and study of journalism as a subject of intellectual inquiry but also an arena of professional practice. Previously, the study of journalism in the UK and much of Europe was a fairly marginal branch of the larger disciplines of media, communication and cultural studies; only a handful of Universities offered degree programmes in the subject. Journalism Studies has flourished and succeeded in providing the intended public space for discussion of research on key issues within the field, to the point where in 2007 a sister journal, Journalism Practice, was launched to enable an enhanced focus on practice-based issues, as well as foregrounding studies of journalism education, training and professional concerns. Both journals are among the leading ranked journals within the field and publish six issues annually, in electronic and print formats. From the outset, the publication of themed issues has been a commitment for both journals. Their purpose is first, to focus on highly significant or neglected areas of the field; second, to facilitate discussion and analysis of important and topical policy issues; and third, to offer readers an especially high quality and closely focused set of essays, analyses and discussions; or all three.

The Journalism Studies: Theory and Practice book series draws on a wide range of these themed issues from both journals and thereby extends the critical and public forum provided by them. The Editor of the journals works closely with guest editors to ensure that the books achieve relevance for readers and the highest standards of research rigour and academic excellence. The series makes a significant contribution to the field of journalism studies by inviting distinguished scholars, academics and journalism practitioners to discuss and debate the central concerns within the field. It also reaches a wider readership of scholars, students and practitioners across the social sciences, humanities and communication arts, encouraging them to engage critically with, but also to interrogate, the specialist scholarly studies of journalism which this series provides.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
SOC052000
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Media Studies