Self-Determination in the Post-9/11 Era

By Elizabeth Chadwick

© 2011 – Routledge

184 pages

Purchasing Options:
Paperback: 9780415859783
pub: 2013-04-11
US Dollars$54.95
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Hardback: 9780415550048
pub: 2011-05-09
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About the Book

This book discusses the increasing tendency in certain government quarters to incorporate struggles by peoples for their self-determination into the wider anti-terrorist agenda of the post-9/11 era. This tendency distorts the laws of armed conflict and of peace alike. As inter-state anti-terrorist co-operation becomes more extensive, the transaction costs of international peace and security between states increase. Modes of domestic state governance are left increasingly to the vagaries of inter-state non-interference in the domestic affairs of each other. The ‘war on terror’ and an increasingly strict, domestic state law-and-order approach to silence political opponents increases the dangers for civilians, eliminates rights, and generates suspect communities. At the same time, public institutions and private corporations are harnessed into the mechanics of a broad project of prevention and control.

Distinctively, the book considers the impact of the recent ‘war on terror’ on the politics of the self-determination of peoples. It draws together issues related to governmental forceful action, an increasing intolerance towards non-state violent acts, the content of international and regional codifications, expansions in state discretion, the encroachment of surveillance powers, and the interaction and overlap between intelligence and law enforcement agencies.

Self-Determination in the Post-9/11 Era will be of interest to students and scholars of public international law, criminology, comparative criminal justice, terrorism and national security, politics, international relations, human rights, governance and public policy.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction 2. Perspectives on Self-Determination in the Post-9/11 Era 3. The Role of Laws of Warfare 4. ‘Peace’ is ‘War’ 5. The Growth in Linkage between Self-Determination and Terrorism: International and Regional Instruments 6. Post-9/11 Statutes and Case Law of the Security Council Permanent Members 7. Conclusions and Final Remarks

About the Author

Elizabeth Chadwick is Reader in War Law at Nottingham Trent University, UK.

About the Series

Routledge Research in International Law

The series offers a space for new and emerging scholars of international law to publish original arguments, as well as presenting alternative perspectives from more established names in international legal research.  Works cover both the theory and practice of international law, presenting innovative analyses of the nature and state of international law itself as well as more specific studies within particular disciplines. The series will explore topics such as the changes to the international legal order, the processes of law-making and law-enforcement, as well as the range of actors in public international law. The books will take a variety of different methodological approaches to the subject including interdisciplinary, critical legal studies, feminist, and Third World approaches, as well as the sociology of international law. Looking at the past, present and future of international law the series reflects the current vitality and diversity of international legal scholarship.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
LAW000000
LAW / General
LAW051000
LAW / International
POL011000
POLITICAL SCIENCE / International Relations / General
POL011010
POLITICAL SCIENCE / International Relations / Diplomacy