Compliance With Treatment In Schizophrenia

By Alec Buchanan

© 1996 – Psychology Press

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Paperback: 9781138871816
pub: 2015-08-20
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Hardback: 9780863774225
pub: 1996-05-12
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e–Inspection Copy

About the Book

There is a myth that people with mental disorders comply poorly with treatment. In fact, psychiatric patients are no more likely than patients in other medical specialities to go against the advice of their doctor. That said, it is easy to find instances where psychotropic medication is refused by the supposed beneficiary. The value of neuroleptic treatment in schizophrenia is now widely accepted. Failure to take such treatment is associated with relapse and relapse may endanger the patient and other people. Despite this, people with schizophrenia frequently fail to take their treatment. This study shows that one third can be expected to be non-compliant within two years of leaving a general adult psychiatry ward. It also looks at the reasons for this: the influence of drug side-effects is examined, as well as the impact of each patient's attitude to treatment and whether or not they have stopped taking prescribed medication in the past.

Table of Contents

Literature Review. Aims of the Research. Method. Results. The Findings in the Light of Previous Work. Implications for Clinical Practice and Future Research. Summary. Appendix. References. Author Index. Subject Index.

About the Series

Maudsley Series

Henry Maudsley, founder of the Maudsley Hospital, was the most prominent English psychiatrist of his generation.

The Maudsley Hospital was united with the Bethlem Royal Hospital in 1948 and its medical school renamed the Institute of Psychiatry. It is now entrusted with the duty of advancing psychiatry by teaching and research. The South London and Maudsley (SLAM) NHS Trust, together with the Institute of Psychiatry, are jointly known as The Maudsley.

The monograph series reports work carried out at The Maudsley. Some of the monographs are directly concerned with clinical problems; others, less obviously relevant, are in scientific fields that are cultivated for the furtherance of psychiatry.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
PSY000000
PSYCHOLOGY / General