Routledge Research in Anticipation and Futures

Series Editors:

Anticipation Studies encompasses scholarship and research into the ways in which ideas, fears, hopes and models of the future inform action in the present. Anticipation Studies is a new field that aims to build interdisciplinary dialogue between the many scholars and researchers in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences who take the relationship between ideas of the future and action in the present as a subject of inquiry. This might include scholars working on individuals, cultures, societies or organisations in fields as diverse as psychology and literature, governance and innovation, design and management studies.

This book series will be a platform for the emerging, interdisciplinary field of Anticipation Studies. The series will enable academics and practitioners from a wide range of fields across the humanities and social sciences to engage in lively debates across disciplinary perspectives and so to deepen their understanding of Anticipation as a phenomenon, a way of knowing and a social, anthropological and cultural reality. Single and co-authored monographs are welcome, as well as edited volumes and shortform books.

We are particularly interested in the following generative questions that might be explored across a range of disciplines and interdisciplinary domains:

Uncertainty – how is the problem of ‘not knowing’ the future understood, valued, explored and addressed in different contexts?

Cultural Diversity – what are the different cultural and historical traditions of anticipation and how might they complement or challenge each other?

Innovation, Experimentation & Agency – how are ideas of the future translated into action?

Equality and Access – what resources are required to support anticipatory practice and how are these patterned socially, culturally, economically?

Anticipatory Emotion & Affect – what non-cognitive and non-rational elements drive anticipatory practices? With what implications?

The Dangers of Anticipation – when does anticipation become pathological, dangerous or risky to individuals, organisations and societies?

Temporality – what models of time underpin anticipatory practice?

Please contact the Editor, Rebecca Brennan (Rebecca.Brennan@tandf.co.uk) to submit proposals.