Improving School Attendance  book cover
SAVE
$11.99
1st Edition

Improving School Attendance





ISBN 9780415178723
Published May 5, 1999 by Routledge
215 Pages

FREE Standard Shipping
 
SAVE $11.99
was $59.95
USD $47.96

Prices & shipping based on shipping country


Preview

Book Description

Although pupil disaffection has been a major concern to professionals, policy makers and researchers for quite some time, recent professional books in the area tend to focus on behaviour and exclusion from schools. Despite considerable government funding in both LEA's and schools- to promote new measures to improve school attendance, non-attendance at school is a relatively neglected topic as far as serious researched-based literature is concerned. This book will be the first in several years concerned with non-attendance.
Previously unpublished research material in the book will provide a multi-disciplinary evaluation of practice at LEA, whole school and individual levels.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Theoretical Debates and Legislative Framework; Chapter 2 Combating Truancy; Chapter 3 School Attendance and the Role of Law in England and Wales; Chapter 4 The relationship between delinquency and non-attendance at school, Cedric Cullingford; Chapter 5 The Effective Collection and Analysis of Attendance Data; Chapter 6 The Essential Elements of an Effective Attendance Policy; Chapter 7 Strategies for Improving School Attendance; Chapter 8 Proactive Primary Approaches to Non-Attendance; Chapter 9 Raising Expectations at Don Valley High School; Chapter 10 Doing Better; Chapter 11 Student Support Groups, Mike Haworth, Kay Bardsley;

...
View More

Editor(s)

Biography

Eric Blyth is Reader in Social Work at the University of Huddersfield.
Judith Milner is a freelance trainer and solutions counsellor.

Reviews

'Professor Reid doesn't just propose incentive schemes; he gives you a list of 70 that he knows will work. It is the completeness of the practical help that is impressive. Work with this book as your guide and your registers will never look the same again.' - Graeme Whyte, SENCO at Rudolph Steiner School, Hertfordshire