2nd Edition

Plant Tissue Culture Concepts and Laboratory Exercises

Edited By Robert N. Trigiano, Dennis J. Gray Copyright 2000
    472 Pages
    by CRC Press

    472 Pages
    by CRC Press

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    Alternating between topic discussions and hands-on laboratory experiments that range from the in vitro flowering of roses to tissue culture of ferns, Plant Tissue Culture Concepts and Laboratory Exercises, Second Edition, addresses the most current principles and methods in plant tissue culture research.

    The editors use the expertise of some of the top researchers and educators in plant biotechnology to furnish students, instructors and researchers with a broad consideration of the field. Divided into eight major parts, the text covers everything from the history of plant tissue culture and basic methods to propagation techniques, crop improvement procedures, specialized applications and nutrition of callus cultures. New topic discussions and laboratory exercises in the Second Edition include "Micropropagation of Dieffenbachia," "Micropropagation and in vitro flowering of rose," "Propagation from nonmeristematic tissue-organogenesis," "Variation in culture" and "Tissue culture of ferns."

    It is the book's extensive laboratory exercises that provide a hands-on approach in illustrating various topics of discussion, featuring step-by-step procedures, anticipated results, and a list of materials needed. What's more, editors Trigiano and Gray go beyond mere basic principles of plant tissue culture by including chapters on genetic transformation techniques, and photographic methods and statistical analysis of data. In all, Plant Tissue Culture Concepts and Laboratory Exercises, Second Edition, is a veritable harvest of information for the continued study and research in plant tissue culture science.

    (Note: Topic chapters appear below in bold upper and lower case letters; Laboratory chapters appear below in nonbold upper and lower case letters.)
    PART I-INTRODUCTION
    Introduction of plant tissue and cell culture
    PART II-HISTORY OF PLANT TISSUE CULTURE
    History of plant tissue and cell culture
    PART III-SUPPORTING METHODOLOGIES
    Getting started with tissue culture-Media preparation, sterile technique and laboratory equipment
    Nutrition of callus cultures
    Histological techniques
    Microscopy and photography
    Statistical analysis of plant tissue culture data
    PART IV-PROPAGATION TECHNIQUES
    Propagation from preexisting meristems
    Micropropagation of Syngonium by shoot culture
    Micropropagation of Dieffenbachia
    Micropropagation of potato by node culture and microtuber production
    Micropropagation of lilac
    Micropropagation and in vitro flowering of rose
    Propagation from nonmeristematic tissues- organogenesis
    Direct shoot organogenesis from leaf explants of chrysanthemum
    Shoot organogenesis of watermelon
    Direct and indirect shoot organogenesis from leaves of Torenia fournieri
    Shoot organogenesis from petunia leaves
    Propagation from nonmeristematic tissues- Nonzygotic embryogenesis
    Embryogenic callus and suspension cultures from leaves of orchardgrass
    Somatic embryogenesis from seeds of melon
    Somatic embryogenesis from mature peanut seed
    Direct somatic embryogenesis from leaves and flower receptacles of cineraria
    Somatic embryogenesis from immature seeds of yellow poplar
    Introduction of somatic embryogenesis in conifers
    PART V-CROP IMPROVEMENT TECHNIQUES
    Use of protoplasts for plant improvement
    Isolation, culture and fusion of tobacco and potato protoplasts
    Isolation of protoplasts from leaves of chrysanthemum and orchardgrass
    Haploid cultures
    Production of haploid tobacco plants using another culture
    Transformation
    Transformation of tobacco and carrot using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and expression of the ß-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene
    Transformation of chrysanthemum leaf explants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens
    Construction and use of a simple gene gun for particle bombardment
    Germplasm preservation
    Vitrification as a method to cryopreserve shoot tips
    Secondary product expression in vitro
    Pigment production in Ajuga cell culture
    In vitro plant pathology
    PART VI-SPECIAL TOPICS
    Variation in culture
    Tissue culture of ferns
    Commercial laboratory production
    Indexing for plant pathogens
    Culture indexing for bacterial and fungal contaminants
    PART VII-APPENDIX I: LIST OF SUPPLIERS
    PART VIII-INDEX

    Biography

    Robert N. Trigiano

    "Instructors and students alike will be delighted by the rich array of responsive plant species and the depth of choice among laboratory exercises that are available in Plant Tissue Culture Concepts and Laboratory Exercises, 2nd edn, edited by Robert N. Trigiano and Dennis J. Gray… The book is refreshingly readable, and the sequence of laboratory exercises leads the reader/student to develop increasing skills and knowledge of the subject matter… The range of subject matter included in the book is extensive… The written protocols do provide timely reminders regarding the benefits of careful labeling of explants and the identities of species/varieties… Laboratory protocols are very complete …Certainly this book will be of practical value in planning and teaching a successful course in plant tissue culture, but it also provides a wealth of general information and will serve as a useful reference for many protocols needed in the daily operations of tissue culture research laboratories. It will be a welcome addition to the library of everyone interested in the subject…"
    - John Hubstenberger, New Mexico State University, in In Vitro Cellular Developmental Biology, Nov.- Dec. 2000

    "The appeal of this practical manual is that it contains very detailed information on how to establish a tissue culture laboratory, from provision of lists of equipment and chemicals and their suppliers, to procedures and protocols for preparing media and carrying out experiments…I would recommend this book highly for teachers and researchers in plant tissue culture as a valuable resource for practical plant tissue culture."
    -Plant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture, Vol. 65, 173-174, 2001

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