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Telenovelas in Pan-Latino Context





ISBN 9781138681767
Published October 3, 2017 by Routledge
168 Pages 14 B/W Illustrations

 
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Book Description

This concise book provides an accessible overview of the history of the telenovela in Latin America within a pan-Latino context, including the way the genre crosses borders between Latin America and the United States. Telenovelas, a distinct variety of soap operas originating in Latin America, take up key issues of race, class, sexual identity and violence, interweaving stories with melodramatic romance and quests for identity. June Carolyn Erlick examines the social implications of telenovela themes in the context of the evolution of television as an integral part of the modernization of Latin American countries.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

  1. Discovering Telenovelas
  2. Change Agents: Beyond the Melodrama

  3. Beyond Betty: Gender and Sexuality

  4. Gay Love, Gay Kisses

  5. Black, White and Brown: Telenovelas and Race

  6. Narconovelas: Beyond the News

  7. Conclusions : Looking Backward and Going Forward

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Author(s)

Biography

June Carolyn Erlick is Publications Director at the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard University and Editor-in-Chief of ReVista, the Harvard Review of Latin America.

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Author - June Carolyn  Erlick
Author

June Carolyn Erlick

editor-in-chief, ReVista, the Harvard Review of Latin America, David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard University
Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

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Reviews

"Erlick is quite persuasive in her contention that the popularity of telenovelas has combined with their mobility to create a quietly subversive force in socially conservative Latin America." - Glenn Garvin, television critic, the Miami Herald, in ReVista, the Harvard Review of Latin America, Winter 2018.