1st Edition

The Career Decisions of Gifted Students and Other High Ability Groups





ISBN 9781138596269
Published June 25, 2018 by Routledge
136 Pages 4 B/W Illustrations

USD $46.95

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Book Description

High ability individuals – gifted students, prodigies, geniuses and twice exceptional students – are a group with enormous potential to have an impact on the advancement of different occupational fields, as well as the lives of others in society.

The Career Decisions of Gifted Students and Other High Ability Groups is the first ever scholarly monograph devoted to an examination of the career decisions of this group. Drawing on extensive research, it provides fresh insights into the history, the influential factors, and the processes associated with the career decisions of gifted students, prodigies, geniuses, and twice exceptional students.

Of relevance to researchers, psychologists, counselors, teachers, policymakers, and families, it also provides possible directions for future practice, to allow for the optimal support of the career decisions of these highly able individuals.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Introduction

Chapter 2: History of the Career Decisions of Gifted Students

Chapter 3: Factors Influencing the Career Decisions of Gifted Students

Chapter 4: The Career Decision-Making Processes of Gifted Students

Chapter 5: The Career Decisions of Prodigies

Chapter 6: The Career Decisions of Geniuses

Chapter 7: The Career Decisions of Twice Exceptional Students

Chapter 8: Conclusion

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Author(s)

Biography

Jae Yup Jung, PhD, is a senior lecturer and a GERRIC senior research fellow at the School of Education at The University of New South Wales.

Reviews

This book makes an important contribution to the international literature on giftedness and its relationship to career decision-making. The author compares career decision processes used by gifted students, prodigies and geniuses, and twice exceptional students. The book is a ‘must read’ for educators concerned with gifted education programs in schools, school counsellors and psychologists, and researchers in the field.

Mantak Yuen, PhD, University of Hong Kong