Cricket and the Law

The Man in White is Always Right

By David Fraser

Series Editors: Guy Osborn, Steven Greenfield

© 2005 – Routledge

-4 pages

Purchasing Options:
New in Paperback: 9780714682853
pub: 2005-07-25
US Dollars$67.95
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Hardback: 9780714653471
pub: 2004-12-22
US Dollars$225.00
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e–Inspection Copy

About the Book

Cricket, law and the meaning of life …

In a readable, informed and absorbing discussion of cricket’s defining controversies – bodyline, chucking, ball-tampering, sledging, walking and the use of technology, among many others – David Fraser explores the ambiguities of law and social order in cricket.

Cricket and the Law charts the interrelationship between cricket and legal theory – between the law of the game and the law of our lives – and demonstrates how cricket’s cultural conventions can escape the confines of the game to carry far broader social meanings.

This engaging study will be enjoyed by lawyers, students of culture and cricket lovers everywhere.

Reviews

'Fraser's book is a considerable achievement that will stand as the benchmark for future legal studies of the playing of sport.' -Tony Collins, THES, 10 February 2006

Table of Contents

1. Introduction 2. The Legal Theory of Cricket 3. Lord Denning, Cricket, Law and the Meaning of Life 4. Dante, Cricket, Law and the Meaning of Life 5. Laws, not Rules or Cricket as Adjudication 6. Law, Codes and the Spirit of the Game 7. More Law and the Spirit of the Game 8. The Man in White is Always Right: Umpires, Judges and the Rule of Law 9. Umpires, Decisions and the Rule of Law 10. The Man in White is Always Right (but he is not always neutral) 11. Technology, Adjudication and Law 12. Leg Before Wicket, Causation and the Rule of Law 13. Mankad, Javed, Hilditch, Sarfraz and the Rule of the Law 14. It's Not Cricket: Underarm Bowling, Legality and the Meaning of Life 15. The Chucker as outlaw: Legality, Morality and Exclusion in Cricket 16. Murali, Shoaib and the Jurisprudence of Chucking 17. Bouncers: Terror and the Rule of Law in Cricket 18. Ball-tampering and the Rule of Law 19. The Little Master: Ball-tampering and the Rule of Law 20. Delay and Over-Rates: Temporality and the Meaning of Cricket 21. Ethical Discourse, Legal Narrative and the Meaning of Cricket 22. You… Sledging and Cricket as Ethical Discourse 23. Walking, the Judicial Function and the Meaning of Life 24. Other Stories about Cricket, Law and the Meaning of Life 25. Capitalism and the Meaning of Cricket 26. Class Struggle, Old School Tie and the Meaning of Cricket 27. The Hill, the Members and Others: the Crowd as Sub-text 28. Bodyline, Postmodernism. Law and the Meaning of Life 29. Conclusion: On Life Law and Cricket

About the Series

Routledge Studies in Law, Society and Popular Culture

Routledge Studies in Law, Society and Popular Culture is an inter-disciplinary series that examines the relationship between the law and all areas of popular culture. Particular foci include the regulation of spheres of popular culture and representations of law within popular culture. ‘Popular Culture’ is a broad and inclusive church that includes all aspects of leisure and culture, including but not confined to music, sport, film, media, night- time economy, art, literature, the internet etc. Whilst law may well provide a useful vehicle for an analysis of cultural activities within society the absence of law in the field may be just as important and worthy of consideration.

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Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
LAW000000
LAW / General
SPO000000
SPORTS & RECREATION / General
SPO054000
SPORTS & RECREATION / Cricket