Postharvest Physiological Disorders in Fruits and Vegetables: 1st Edition (Hardback) book cover

Postharvest Physiological Disorders in Fruits and Vegetables

1st Edition

Edited by Sergio Tonetto de Freitas, Sunil Pareek

CRC Press

824 pages | 355 Color Illus. | 10 B/W Illus.

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Description

This book, chock full of color illustrations, addresses the main postharvest physiological disorders studied in fruits and vegetables. For a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, Postharvest Physiological Disorders in Fruits and Vegetablesdescribes visual symptoms, triggering and inhibiting mechanisms, and approaches to predict and control these disorders after harvest. Color photographs illustrate the disorders, important factors, physiology, and management.The book includes a detailed description of the visual symptoms, triggering and inhibiting mechanisms, and possible approaches to predict and control physiological disorders. The mechanisms triggering and inhibiting the disorders are discussed in detail in each chapter, based on recent studies, which can help readers better understand the factors regulating each disorder. The description of possible approaches to predict and control each disorder can help growers, shippers, wholesalers, and retailers to determine the best management practices to reduce disorder incidence and crop losses.

Features:

  • Presents visual symptoms of postharvest physiological disorders that will help readers to precisely identify the disorders in fruits and vegetables
  • Details mechanisms triggering and inhibiting the postharvest disorders
  • Explains possible approaches to predict and control these disorders
  • Suggests the best postharvest management approaches for each crop

Although there are many scientific publications on postharvest physiological disorders, there are no recent reviews or books putting together the most recent information about the mechanisms regulating, as well as about the possible approaches to predict and control these disorders.

Table of Contents

Contents

Dedication………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… v

Foreword………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..xiii

Preface………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….xvii

Acknowledgments……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………xix

Editors……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………xxi

Contributors………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….xxiii

Section I General Issues, Physiological and Technological Effects

1 Postharvest Physiological Disorders in Fruit and Vegetables……………………………………………… 3

Sergio Tonetto de Freitas and Sunil Pareek

2 Pre-Harvest Cultural Practices Affecting Postharvest Physiological Disorders,

Minerals, and Titratable Acidity in Cucurbit Melon………………………………………………………… 15

Hong Li

3 Oxidative Stress and Physiological Disorders…………………………………………………………………… 29

Christian Larrigaudière and Jordi Giné-Bordonaba

4 Chilling Injury………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 61

Palash Biswas and David A. Brummell

5 Disorders During Storage of Fruits and Vegetables………………………………………………………….. 89

Daniel Alexandre Neuwald, Adriano Arriel Saquet, Nadine Klein

6 Positive and Negative Effects of Heat Treatment on the Incidence of Physiological

Disorders in Fresh Produce……………………………………………………………………………………………. 111

Elazar Fallik and Zoran Ilic

7 Cracking in Fruits and Vegetables…………………………………………………………………………………. 127

Ali Khadivi

Section II Temperate Fruits

8 Apple…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 165

Christopher B. Watkins and James P. Mattheis

9 Berries………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 207

R.R. Sharma and Vijay Rakesh Reddy S.

10 Cherry………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 223

Bed Prasad Khatiwada and Elizabeth Mitcham

11 Table Grape………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 237

Bruno G. Defilippi, Sebastian A. Rivera, Alonso Perez-Donoso, Mauricio Gonzalez-

Aguero, and Reinaldo Campos-Vargas

12 Muskmelon……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 261

Juan Pablo Fernandez-Trujillo

13 Peach and Nectarine……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 293

George A. Manganaris, Ariel R. Vicente, Pedro J. Martinez-Garcia, and Carlos H. Crisosto

14 European Pear………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 305

Yan Wang and Kazem Arzani

15 Asian Pear…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 329

Kazem Arzani

Section III Tropical and Sub-Tropical Fruits

16 Banana………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 349

Scot C. Nelson and Sarah J. Pethybridge

17 Citrus……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 377

Joanna Lado, Paul JR Cronje, Maria Jesus Rodrigo, and Lorenzo Zacarias

18 Date………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 399

Salah M. Aleid

19 Kiwifruit……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 421

Sunny George Gwanpua, Munazza Saeed, Abdul Jabbar and Julian Heyes

20 Litchi…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 435

Yueming Jiang

21 Mango…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 443

Jeffrey K. Brecht

22 Papaya………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 467

Jurandi G. OLIVEIRA, Luis M.M. MORALES, Willian B. SILVA, Aroldo GOMES FILHO

and Robert E. PAULL

23 Persimmon……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 495

C. Besada, A. Woolf and A. Salvador

24 Pineapple………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 513

Robert E. Paull and Nancy Jung Chen

25 Pomegranate…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 529

Mustafa Erkan and Adem Dogan

26 Rambutan and Longkong………………………………………………………………………………………………. 551

Chalermchai Wongs-Aree and Sompoch Noichinda

27 Mangosteen…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 589

Sompoch Noichinda, Kitti Bodhipadma and Chalermchai Wongs-Aree

28 Amazon Fruit………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 615

Joao P. Santos Neto, Deborah O. De Fusco, Patricia Maria Pinto, and Gustavo Henrique

de Almeida Teixeira

Section IV Vegetables and Tubers

29 Brassicas……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 631

Joaqui n H. Hasperue , Facundo Massolo, and Gustavo A. Marti nez

30 Cucurbits………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 661

Jamal Javanmardi and Mohammad Pessarakli

31 Potato Tuber…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 691

Dilson A. Bisognin, Arione da S. Pereira, and Sergio Tonetto de Freitas

32 Solanaceous Fruits…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 705

Vicente A.R., Concellon A., Zaro M.J., and Ortiz C.M

33 Tropical Tuber Crops……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 719

Sanket J. More, V. Ravi, and Saravanan Raju

Section V Processed Fruits and Vegetables

34 Fresh-Cut Fruits and Vegetables……………………………………………………………………………………..761

Amodio M.L., Cefola M., Pace B., and Colelli G.

35 Juice of Fruits and Vegetables……………………………………………………………………………………….. 785

Ana Cecilia Poloni Rybka, Aline Telles Biasoto Marques, Rita de Cassia Mirela Resende

Nassur, and Emanuel Jose Nascimento Marques

Section VI Final Considerations

36 Future Studies on Postharvest Physiological Disorders in Fruit and Vegetables………………. 805

Sérgio Tonetto de Freitas and Sunil Pareek

Index……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 815

About the Editors

Sergio Tonetto de Freitas is a researcher on Postharvest Physiology and Technology at the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation, Embrapa. Before working at Embrapa, he was a PhD student in the Plant Biology Graduate Group, and latter a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Plant Science Department at the University of California, Davis. His PhD and Postdoctoral researches were focused on understanding the mechanisms regulating fruit susceptibility to calcium (Ca2+) deficiency disorders. Although these disorders have been studied for more than a hundred years, his PhD and Postdoctoral studies proved for the first time that fruit susceptibility to Ca2+ deficiency disorders is mainly regulated by mechanisms controlling cellular Ca2+ partitioning and distribution. He also has experience in biochemistry, plant molecular biology, laboratory techniques, statistic programs. He has received a total of five UCDavis awards, three Jastro Shields research award, one Joseph M. Ogawa research and teaching endowment award, and one Shapiro Family award for excellence in science.

Dr. Sunil Pareek obtained Ph.D. in Horticulture (PHT) from Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner, India. He joined Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology (MPUAT), Udaipur, India in 2005. Before moving as Associate Professor to National Institute of Food Technology Entrepreneurship and Management (NIFTEM), Kundli, Haryana, India in 2015 he was at Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology (MPUAT), Udaipur, India from 2005 to 2015. He is involved in teaching UG, PG and Ph.D. students with special focus on postharvest physiology, technology and processing of fruits. Dr. Pareek has published more than 40 papers, 40 presentations in National and International Seminars and Conferences, 6 books, 3 manuals, 6 technical bulletins, 40 popular articles, and several book chapters to his credit.

About the Series

Innovations in Postharvest Technology Series

Learn more…

Subject Categories

BISAC Subject Codes/Headings:
TEC003000
TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING / Agriculture / General
TEC012000
TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING / Food Science